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slORWOOD SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL - NORWOOD MASSACHUSETTS 




With his every action and word we have become more and more aware 
of the service rendered to us by this man. His unselfish devotion to his 
work, unwavering will power, his firm sense of right is tempered with 
patience, kindness, and a deep respect for others. 

To pay tribute for his courtesy, generosity, and fellowship we, the 
members of the Class of 1947, dedicate this Tiot to Mr. Charles A. Haydsn. 





Jaculh^ 



To the facult}' we owe our sincere and heartfelt 
thanks for the amazing feat performed in guiding us 
through three turbulent years. At times we seemed 
to block and counter-attack their attempts to incul- 
cate a portion of the fountain of knowledge into our 
unreceptive brains. We even thought that they 
devised fiendish schemes for keeping our noses to 
the grindstone. 



MISS GOW 









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MR. O'DONNELL 



Now that we are able to look back upon the past 
three years, we feel that they have borne up admir- 
ably under the strain, and we would like to think 
that their labors have not been in vain. With grati- 
tude in our hearts, we thank them for their friendly 
counsel, advice, and understanding. Indeed we are 
greatly indebted to the faculty of the School on the 
Hill for their co-operation and tireless efforts in 
our behalf. 





Left to right — Blasenak, Egge, Co-Art Editors; Perniola, Sykes, Co-Editors-in-Chief ; Latham, Co-Circu- 
lation Editor; Wheeler, Co-Advertising Editor; Standing, Williamson, Co-Photography Editor; 
DelSignore, Cartoon Editor; Gay, Co-Photography Editor; McTernan, Co- Advertising Editor; 
Cekovich, Co-Circulation Editor. 



diahiL JiwuLL 



The class of '47 with its usual progressiveness instituted a new plan 
whereby the co-editors-in-chief of the yearbook would be elected in the 
spring. In this way Bernard Sykes and Irene Perniola were able to start 
planning for the "big year" during the summer. In September the remainder 
of the editorial staff was elected with Vanita Egge and Janet Blasenak, 
co-art editors; Janice Wheeler and Charles McTernan, co-advertising 
editors; Payton Williamson and Paul Gay, co-photography editors; Mary 
Latham and Richard Frates, co-circulation editors, and Thomas DelSignore, 
cartoon editor. 

We were assigned to the Tiot Room which seemed to us an ideal haven 
and retreat and, we made certain, an inaccessible place of mystery to the 
uninitiated. We'll never forget . . . the daily meetings of the crew where 
we conducted our big business deals, designed sensational layouts and 
waxed forth with theories on everything from Russian politics to Boy Dates 
Girl . . . the strange penchant some of us had for misplacing vital papers and 
pictures, this necessitating a thorough search of the premises and oh the 
hidden treasures that were found! . . . our experiments with the spray gun 
which left its mark on everyone and everything in range . . . On Saturdays 
and vacation days we toiled away till we were literally numb . . . the heat 
was always turned on when we were about ready to leave . . . the big adver- 
tising campaigns . . . the trips up the "stairway to heaven" at the engravers. 
As D-Day (deadline date) loomed threateningly ahead of us we set to work 
in earnest . . . schedules were made out and surprisingly enough were fol- 
lowed . . . the book began to shape up and with the excellent co-operation of 
many people finally completed . . . Deo Gratias. 



The Times of Our Lives 



It was a singularly fortunate, epoch-making class of many di- 
versified talents that strode into the halls of the School on the 
Hill in the beautiful but troubled Autumn of '44. Concealing 
our fears and confusions by a camouflage of self-importance and 
a strange secret elation that we were now playing in Big Time, 
we began our three year reign. Time "spread its circuit" around 

us and stretched ahead interminably ours to do with what 

we willed. "The vast, the unbounded prospect lay before us." 

Those years have galloped by, and now that our sense of value 
of Time, that most fleeting of all essences, has become more vivid 
and the golden years and gay are slipping into the category of 
priceless memories, we are aware that our high school days have 
indeed been the Times of Our Lives. 

We have had rare times, hot times, high //wAgay times, soft 
times, hard times, and occasionally sad and sprry\f imes. If our 
days had all been happy, we might have taken as little note of 
them as the sun-dial does of those that are cl<ij|gy| 

We remember doing time in detention, gyytoy j] time in the 
corridors, making time after school, having mirsetves a time at 
our many school functions. Time was never (i oli ands; we've 
improved each shining hour. The tunes our K:ails seat time to 
will always be haunting melodies, reminis celnt^p i t ^e Hill, our 



teachers, and our schoolmates, bringing back to us th^ realization 
that nothing can equal the Times that we us 

"The Bird of Time has but a little way 
To flutter — and the Bird is o ti 1 lilt) ^l'liy.' 



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Long ago in the dear dead days almost 
beyond recall (but always alive in our 
hearts) 200 laughing lads and lassies began 
their illustrious careers as members of the 
class of 1947. The exclamations of "Ohs!" 
and "Ah!" and "Have you seen that hand- 
some senior on traffic?" and the doleful 
cries of "I'm lost!" soon began to echo 
throughout the hallowed halls of Norwood 
High. But we were a progressive class and 
before long we knew not only teachers and 
pupils but above all our geographic 
position. 

From that day forward there was no 
stopping us or so we thought. The pride 
we felt when we cast our first ballots for 
class officers and the admirable choice we 
made with Charlie McTernan as president 
and Teddy Campisano as vice-president, 
Ginny Forrest as secretary, Mary Jane 
Hillman and George Boyden as treasurers, 
and Janice Wheeler as A. A. Representa- 
tive — we came through the trials and tur- 
moils with great success. 

Within a few weeks we received that 
distinction, usually reserved for Seniors, 
of being asked to remain after assembly — 
for we were to make our formal debut at 
the Sophomore Party that night — and 
what a wonderful party it was! Who will 
ever forget the antics of MacKenzie and 
Jankowski? After the excitement of our 
social success died down there were many 
other everyday things (classes) to occupy 
our minds — such as hastily putting tri- 
angles together on the school bus, assisting 



Caesar on his all-too-many campaigns, 
writing those awful themes the night 
before the deadline, and most important 
getting to that football game, be it at home 
or on a far-away field. In no time Christ- 
mas had rolled around and it was vacation 
time. We returned from vacation with 
renewed vim and vigor and we promptly 
decided to have a play. For weeks we 
whipped down to 106 and read plays, dis- 
cussed parts, and finally, selected just the 
right play only to learn that there was no 
room for a Sophomore Play on the social 
calendar — but we were not dismayed and 
so we put our talents to work on a new 
project, the famous "Tot." And when the 
day on which the pages of "Tot" circulated 
throughout the corridors of Norwood High 
finally came, everyone admitted that the 
Class of 1947 had scored another victory. 
Meanwhile life continued as usual — we 
still anticipated those assemblies that Rog 
had charge of, we hero-worshipped T. J., 
Tommy Curran and others (wonder how 
many of the female sex still worship 
members of '45?), assignments had to be 
done — and we had to pass that horrible 
marching test in Gym. Then before we 
knew it the Senior Prom was upon us — 
how happy we were when that bid finally 
came — we had such a grand time. The 
Prom spirit betook us and we attempted to 
have one of our own — but once more we 
were disappointed. At least no one can 
ever say we weren't the most enterprising 
Sophomore class ever to enter Norwood 
High! 



JhsL $M&rL y&a/L 





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MARION CURRAN 

"Don't forget to be sensible" — "Remember the traffic rules" — "Stand 
when the Seniors enter the assembly." With these and many other such 
thoughts firmly imprinted on our minds we embarked upon our Junior 
Year — more often called "The Awkward Stage" — hence the above resolves 
to assist us in the struggle not to be ignorant. But we soon forgot these reso- 
lutions and life again resumed its regular cadence. 

Perhaps I shouldn't say regular for there had been some changes made. 
Ye Olde Liberty Bell no longer tolled at 1:30 — it was now 2:20. But this 
had its compensations: a couple of extra minutes added to that too short 
lunch period, and a 35-minute homeroom period right after lunch — to digest 
our food in? — Oh! no — to get our fifth and sixth period homework done 
in; to have a sectional in; and soon we found it very valuable in making 
plans for our Junior Party — which was one of the most enjoyable voyages 
of our career. Remember the little waves in Mac's voyage? 

Of course we had our foolish moments — fads and fancies — Frankie's 
fan club — bow ties, crooning and all — loud lumber jackets in vogue at our 
not too successful but thoroughly stimulating football games — they were 
our heroes, win or lose! — then matter-of-factly we adopted Garner's as our 
official "hangout" — soon we needed a rest as vacation (as it inevitably does) 
afforded the opportunity. 

With the New Year came Mr. Hayden, our present principal; Mr. Butler, 
Mr. Kelley, Mr. Sullivan, and Mr. Fisher, welcome additions to our faculty. 

Shortly after this our hearts were greatly saddened by the passing of 
our dear friend and principal, Mr. Thompson. Under his guidance we had 
learned to love and appreciate all that is good in life. 

Even though we were grieved by his departure we realized that life 
must continue as usual and he would have wanted it that way, so we 
proceeded to select our class rings — a tangible medium by which the class 
was tied together — then came our Junior Prom — one more link in our 
growing chain of success. 

We had our unsuccessful moments (chiefly in classes) for after guiding 
Caesar home, we were forced to help Cicero with his orations (could this 
be the reason so many Juniors greeted each other thus: "Let's 'trot' out 
onto the field") — then there was the time one of our "mad" scientists pro- 
duced a minor explosion in the Chemistry lab — but every cloud has its 
silver lining and Ben Sykes was ours for with his election of Vice-President 
to the Eastern Massachusetts Association of Student Councils, we had one 
more ... to add to our laurels. 

I mustn't forget to mention our class officers — Edward Costello held 
the Presidency, Frank Cekovich was one step under him, Ginny Forrest 
did the clerical work, Joan Dwane and Skippy Gay counted the money, and 
Rena Venterosa and Ted Campisano represented us on the A. A. Council. 
Ah, yes! They all deserve a bow! 

Soon it was time for the little sisters and brothers to give their big 
sisters and brothers Class Day — a duty which we discharged creditably, 
and then they departed from the school, leaving us to reconcile ourselves 
to the fact that we were the oldest "kids" in the school. The ones that the 
Sophomores looked up awefully at and murmured "Gee . . ." 




JCtuwxL&L JimsL 



MISS KENEPICK 

Seniors! And how we had longed for this day, when we might command 
the respect of our underclassmen and excel the records of previous classes. 
The tinge of pride we felt when we assumed our duties as traffic officers — 
when the Sophomores and Juniors rose as we entered the assembly hall, 
but above all, the day when Mr. Hayden told us that we were the class 
that he would depend on for help and support in all school activities. 

During the summer three new members had been added to the faculty — 
Mr. O'Donnell, our ever efficient sub-master; Mr. Scafati, who has gained 
the respect and admiration of everyone in so short a time; and Mr. Levanitis, 
whose sincerity and enthusiasm quickly endeared him to us all. 

The first business of the year was elections. With a sure step we 
approached the election booths and this time the peoples' choices were: Ben 
Sykes, as our chief magistrate, with Dick Sager assisting him; Ginny Forrest 
was once again chosen to keep our records; Joan Dwane and Skippy Gay 
as comptrollers of our finances; while on Rena Venter osa and Sonny Mattson 
we bestowed the honor of representing us on the A. A. Council. 

Within a few days, we were busily at work collecting material, checking 
up on the latest gossip, and stapling together the pages of our first football 
programs. How excited we were before that first game! . . . The cheer- 
leaders' first chance — the success or failure of our literary efforts to be 
determined — and above all the team's first chance of the year! Our excite- 
ment soared even higher when Mr. Hayden thoughtfully planned a rally 
for the Friday afternoon before the game. By Saturday afternoon we were 
all very tense and prayerful — and then the game — and we won! We 
won! ! ! Both our cheerleaders and our programs were a success. The 
football season was off to a glorious start! 

About this time some members of our class became very social-minded 
and the "Spoon Club," an organization which has fostered many worthwhile 
projects, was founded. And while on the subject of society, I must not 
forget to mention the "Sub-Deb Club," which came into existence in our 
Junior year, and the "Kan Club," which was established shortly after the 
"Spoon Club." 

Two weeks before our Turkey Day classic things really began to hum — 
plans were being made for our gigantic Torchlight Parade and Rally. We 
discovered another one of Mr. Hayden's many talents when he took over 
the painful job of teaching many of the "two left-footed" members of the 
school the correct way to march. (Gym was never like that!) Thanks to 
the untiring efforts of the committees in charge, the foresight and advice 
of our principal, and the marvelous co-operation of the entire student body, 
we carried on the Parade and Rally in typical style — the best! ! 

The next three weeks found us rushing around preparing for our 
Senior Play. Rehearsals, rehearsals, and still more rehearsals were held — 
committees were formed — everyone (inclusive of time) was working and 
on the memorable nights of December thirteenth and fourteenth we reaped 
the rewards of our toil! 



Lest you forget I will remind you that English, French, bookkeeping, 
algebra, physics, and all the other classes were still in session, and assign- 
ments were still being given. All this and the fact that a few extra bottles 
accidentally broke in the lunchroom (do you remember?) For these reasons 
we greeted Christmas happily. 

After vacation came a rapid succession of events — first, there was our 
introduction to what soon became our second home — the Tiot Room . . . The 
hockey season . . . then that long-yearned-for Senior Prom — our own Senior 
Prom — the Prom which surpassed all other Senior Proms! . . . then came 
the primping and posing for our graduation pictures . . . the victorious 
basketball team . . . the elections for Senior superlatives and at present we 
are whipping up our "Satellites," which, surely, will be a great hit. 

The success that we have enjoyed this year is due in a great measure 
to the patience, understanding, and efficiency of our Senior Adviser, Miss 
Kenefick. All we can offer her is our sincere thanks and appreciation for 
being so wonderful to us. 

And now that the time has come for us to leave Norwood High we 
are looking ahead to the future — the future which can mean but one thing 
for each and every member of our class — success! We promise Mr. Hayden 
that it will be the type of success that will always make him proud of his 
first graduating class — the class of 1947. 

Marion Curran 



Left to right — Gay, Treasurer; Venterosa, A. A. Council; Sykes, President; Forrest, Secretary; Sager, 
Vice-President. Not shown: Dwane, Treasurer; Mattson, A. A. Council. 







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SENIORS 




EDWARD ADAMONIS "Ed" 
1251 Washington St. 

"Merry and carefree he wends 
his way." 
Torch Light Parade; Band 
Drive; Property Committee 
Senior Play; Member of the 
Spoon Club. 



GEORGE ASSIM "Chucky" 
33 Dean St. Trade School 

"Every inch a man, although 
there aren't many inches." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Intramural Basketball ; Mana- 
ger of Football Team; Senior 
Play; Senior Party Committee; 
Torch Light Parade. 



ALDONA ANTONITIS "Al" 

1247 Washington St. 

"Smiling always with a never- 
fading serenity of countenance." 
Refreshment Committee 
Sophomore Party; Football, 
Basketball Ticket Seller; Usher- 
ette Senior Play; Lunch Room 
Ticket Seller. 



HELEN BAKER 
63 Adams St. 



Gillis 



"Quiet and true, a good friend 
to you." 
Refreshment Committee 
Sophomore Party; Ticket, Re- 
freshment Committees Senior 
Party; Ticket, Decoration Com- 
mittees Senior Prom; Torch 
Light Parade; Candy Commit- 
tee Senior Play; Usherette 
Senior Play. 



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SOPHIE BAKER "Butch" 

996 Washington St. Business 

"Good nature is one of the rich- 
est fruits of personality." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Torch Light Parade. 



MARION BARTUCCA "Snooks" 
18 Sturtevant Ave. Business 

"Patient and still and full of 
good will." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Torch Light Parade; Usherette 
Senior Play. 



HELEN BALFOUR "Buckets" 
459 Washington St. College 

"Her friends — they are many, 
Her foes — are there any?" 
Refreshment Committee 
Sophomore Party ; Decoration 
Committee Junior Party; Pho- 
tography, Advertising Commit- 
tees Yearbook; Torch Light 
Parade; Refreshment, Decora- 
tion Committees Senior Party; 
Ticket Committee Senior Prom; 
Candy Committee, Usherette 
Senior Play; Lunch Counter 
2, 3. 



WILMA BENJAMIN "Billie" 
268 Lenox St. Cosmetologist 

"The veins of diamonds in thine 
eyes could furnish crowns for 
all the Queens on earth." 
Home Room Rep. Peabody 
School 2, 3; Christmas Sale 2; 
Christmas Tea 2. 




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JANE BERGMAN "Bergie" 

893 Washington St. College 

"A willing heart, a helping 
hand, always ready on demand." 
Home Room Rep. 2; Student 
Cooperative Association Presi- 
dent 3; Student Council 3; 
Torch Light Parade; Usherette 
Senior Play; Halloween Party 
Committee; Open House Usher- 
ette 2; Christmas Sale Commit- 
tee 2, 3; Christmas Formal; 
Step Party Committee 2, 3; Edi- 
tor Peabody School Paper 2. 



JEANNETTE BLAIS 
1150 Washington St. 



"Jen" 



"The glass of fashion, the mould 
of form." 
Ticket Committee Sophomore 
Party; Ticket Committee Jun- 
ior Prom; Basketball, Football 
Ticket Seller; Ticket Committee 
Senior Play; Usherette Senior 
Play; Lunch Room Ticket 
Seller. 




VINCENT BILOTTA "Vinny" 
42 Austin St. Work 

"He is the mildest mannered 
man." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Football 1; Torch Light Parade; 
Band Drive; Member Spoon 
Club. 



JANET BLASENAK "Blaz" 

341 Railroad Ave. 

Rhode Island 
School of Design 

"Her air, her manner, all who 
saw admired." 
Decoration Committee Soph- 
omore Party; Co-Art Editor 
Tiot Jr.; Decoration Committee 
Junior Prom; Home Room Rep. 
1, 2; Corresponding Secretary 
3; Archery 1; Co- Art Editor 
Yearbook; Editor Football Pro- 
grams; Senior Float, Poster 
Committees Torch Light Pa- 
rade; Decoration Committee 
Junior Party; Prop. Committee 
Senior Play; Decoration Com- 
mittee Class Day '46; Usherette 
Senior Satellites '46; Horizon 
Club 1, 2, 3; Traffic Squad; 
Decoration Committee Senior 
Prom. 



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RICHARD BOCH 

742 Neponset St. 



"Richy" 



MARY BOULIS 
26 St. George Ave. 



"There is a history in all men's 
minds." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Graduation Usher; Traffic 
Squad; Yearbook Advertising 
Staff; Senior Party Committee; 
Senior Prom Committee; Cast 
Senior Play; Member Spoon 
Club. 



JOHN BOWLES "Jackie" 

1329 Washington St. 

Professional Baseball 

"Happy am I; from cares I am 
free." 
Baseball 2, 3; Basketball 1, 3; 
Football Manager 3 ; Intramural 
Basketball 1, 2, 3; Hockey 2; 
Football 1, 2; Torch Light Pa- 
rade; Treasurer Spoon Club. 



"A wise and understanding 
heart." 
Senior Representative Pea- 
body School; Cast Peabody 
Play. 



GEORGE BOYDEN "Potsy" 
24 Press Ave. College 

"God helps him who strives 
hard." 
Class Treasurer 1; Tiot Jr. 
Staff; Entertainment Commit- 
tee Sophomore Party; Usher 
Senior Satellites '46; Senior 
Prom Committee; Intramural 
Basketball 2, 3; Torch Light 
Parade; Band Drive; Cast Sen- 
ior Play; Orchestra 3; Band 2, 
3; Rifle Club 3; Usher Senior 
Play. 








RICHARD BUDAHL "Dick" 
795 Washington St. College 

"My style is my own, purely 
original." 
Entertainment Committee 
Junior Party; Graduation 
Usher '46; Student Council 3; 
Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3; 
Traffic Squad; Torch Light Pa- 
rade; Cast Senior Play. 



THEODORE CAMPISANO 

"Ted" 

42 Sturtevant Ave. Work 

"Friendship is a sheltering 
tree." 
Vice President 1 ; A. A. Coun- 
cil 2; Graduation Usher '46; 
Baseball 1, 2, Co-Capt. 3; Foot- 
ball 1, 2, 3; Basketball 1, 2, 3; 
Traffic Squad; Torch Light 
Parade; Member of Spoon Club. 



PAUL CAMELIO 
60 Winslow Ave. 



'Madink" 
Business 



"I'm no angel." 

Entertainment Committee 
Sophomore Party; Hockey 1, 2; 
Traffic Squad; Decoration Com- 
mittee Senior Party ; Decoration 
Committee Senior Prom; Band 
Drive; Cast Senior Play; Mem- 
ber of Spoon Club. 



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CATHERINE CARCHEDI \{ 

"Cathy" ^ 

12 Shaw St. Cosmetologist 3 

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"She has a merry heart and a i 

twinkling eye." £ 



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DOMENIC CARCHEDI "Dom" 
22 Lenox Ave. Work 

"Mankind is all stamped equal 
at birth, virtue alone the differ- 
ence makes on earth." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Baseball 2, 3; Basketball 3; In- 
tramural Basketball 3; Senior 
Party Committee; Torch Light 
Parade; Member Spoon Club. 



FLORENCE CHASE 
51 Dean St. 



"Flossie" 



"She hides herself behind a 
busy brain." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Tiot Jr. Committee; Senior 
Party Committee; Senior Prom 
Committee; Torch Light Parade. 



FRANK CEKOVICH 
169 Railroad Ave. 

"With affection beaming in one 
eye and calculation shining out 
of the other." 
Vice President 2; Decoration 
Committee Sophomore Party; 
Graduation Usher '46; Junior 
Prom Committee; Hockey 1, 2, 
3; Traffic Squad; Co-Circula- 
tion Editor Yearbook; Decora- 
tion Committee Seni~r Prom; 
Decoration Committee Senior 
Party; Torch Light Parade; 
Band Drive; Cast Senior Play. 



EDWARD CISTERNELLI 

"Sisty" 
1120 Washington St. 

"And still they gazed and still 
their wonder grew — how one 
small head could carry all he 
knew." 
Junior Prom Committee; In- 
tramural Basketball 3; Traffic 
Squad; Senior Party Commit- 
tee; Torch Light Parade; Band 
Drive. 





STANLEY COBB "Bud" 

215 Vernon St. School 

"His business is pleasure; his 
work is play." 
Football Programs; Senior 
Party Committee; Senior Prom 
Committee; Torch Light Pa- 
rade; Band Drive. 



PAUL CODY 
56 Ellis Ave. 



"Itchy' 



"Wit makes its own welcome." 
Refreshment Committee 
Senior Party; Torch Light Pa- 
rade; Property Committee Sen- 
ior Play. 



DOROTHY CODY 
180 Railroad Ave. 



"Dottie' : 



"The mildest manners and the 
gentlest heart." 
Torch Light Parade; Senior 
Party Committee ; Usherette 
Senior Play. 



ELEANOR CONCANNON 

"Ellie" 
16 High St. Business School 

"It is tranquil people who ac- 
complish much." 
Decoration Committee Junior 
Prom; Basketball 1; Torch 
Light Parade. 



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MIRIAM PATRICIA CONLEY 
"Tish" 

28 Silver St. College 

"For the good are always the 
merry." 
Ticket Committee Sophomore 
Party; Decoration Committee 
Junior Prom; Decoration Com- 
mittee Junior Party; Tiot Jr. 
Committee; Archery 1, 3; Ten- 
nis 1; Basketball 3; Advertising 
Committee Yearbook; Torch 
Light Parade; Ticket Commit- 
tee Senior Play; Usherette Sen- 
ior Satellites '46. 

EDWARD COSTELLO "Flippo" 
96 Railroad Ave. Dartmouth 

"I'll awake one morning and 
find myself famous." 
Class President 2; Tiot Jr. 
Staff; Sophomore Party Com- 
mittee; Graduation Usher; Jun- 
ior Prom Committee; Student 
Council 1, Executive Board 2, 
President 3; Football 1, 2; In- 
tramural Basketball; Traffic 
Squad; Advisory Board Year- 
book; Football Programs; Sen- 
ior Prom Committee; Senior 
Party Committee; Torch Light 
Parade; Band Drive; Cast Sen- 
ior Play. 



MICHAEL CONNOLLY "Sabu" 
16 Monroe St. Prep School 

"When my cue comes call me 
and I will answer." 
Football 2, 3; Hockey 2, 3; 
Baseball 2, 3; Intramural Bas- 
ketball 1, 2, 3; Track 3; Spoon 
Club; Senior Party Committee; 
Senior Prom Committee; Torch 
Light Parade. 



PATRICIA COSTELLO "Patty" 
109 Casey St. Business College 

"Pretty to walk with, and witty 
to talk with." 
Refreshment, Entertainment 
Committees Sophomore Party; 
Refreshment Committee Junior 
Prom; Refreshment Committee 
Junior Party; Traffic Squad; 
Torch Light Parade; Ticket 
Committee Class Day '46; Ticket 
Committee Senior Play; Tiot Jr. 
Staff. 





REGINA CORMIER "Reggie" 
25 North Ave. Cosmetologist 

"The gift of amusement brings 
the happiness of laughter to 
many." 
Tiot Jr. Staff; Yearbook. 



HELEN CURRAN 
24 Grant Ave. 



'Stretch" 



"The only way to have a friend 
is to be one." 
Refreshment Committee 
Sophomore Party ; Tiot Jr. Com- 
mittee; Decoration Committee 
Junior Party; Decoration Com- 
mittee Junior Prom; Basketball 
3; Traffic Squad; Decoration 
Committee Senior Party; Ticket 
Committee Senior Prom; Lunch 
Room Ticket Seller; Torch 
Light Parade. 



PATRICIA ANN COUGHLIN 

"Patty" 
19 Veteran Road Marriage 

"No matter where, there is 

peace in her smile, 
A cheerful good nature that 

needs no guile." 
Ticket Committee Sophomore 
Party ; Ticket Committee Junior 
Prom; Decoration Committee 
Junior Party; Photography, Ad- 
vertising Committees Yearbook; 
Traffic Squad; Torch Light Pa- 
rade; Refreshment Committee 
Senior Party; Ticket Committee 
Se'nior Prom; Ticket Commit- 
tee Senior Play; Lunch Room 
Ticket Seller; Football Ticket 
Seller; Usherette for Concert 
'45. 

MARION LOUISE CURRAN 
51 East Vernon St. College 

"Chic from shoes to hat, attrac- 
tive and capable." 
Decoration, Ticket Commit- 
tees Sophomore Party; Tiot Jr. 
Staff; Decoration, Refreshment 
Committees Junior Prom; Bas- 
ketball 1, 3; Tennis 1, 3; Ad- 
visory Board Yearbook ; Football 
Programs; Senior Party Com- 
mittee; Senior Prom Commit- 
tee; Torch Light Parade; Cast 
Senior Play; Ticket Committee 
Class Day '46; Usherette Senior 
Satellites '46. 



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TIMOTHY CURRAN "Timmy" 
50 Plimpton Ave. Business 

"A man who lives right, and is 
right, has more power in his 
silence than in his words." 
Hockey 1, 2, 3; Track 1, 2, 3; 
Spoon Club Secretary. 



ETHEL DAVISON "Davie" 

16 Rosmary St. Nursing 

"Her hair is of the gold and her 
eyes are of the blue." 
Entertainment Committee 
Sophomore Party; Junior Prom 
Ticket, Decoration Committees; 
Archery 1, 2, 3; Basketball 3; 
Traffic Squad; Advertising 
Committee Yearbook; Junior 
Party Decoration, Entertain- 
ment Committees; Ticket Com- 
mittee, Usherette Senior Play; 
Usherette Senior Satellites '46; 
Decoration Committee Senior 
Prom; Senior Party Entertain- 
ment, Decorating Committee; 



GERALD DAVIS "Gerry" 

229 Winter Street College 

"Quiet and true, 
A good friend to you." 
Publicity Committee Sopho- 
more Party; Band 1, 2, 3; Foot- 
ball 2; Intramural Basketball 
1, 2, 3; Junior Party, Junior 
Prom Decoration Committees; 
Torch Light Parade; Band 
Drive; Student Council 2; Stage 
Manager Senior Play; Adver- 
tising Staff Yearbook; Decora- 
tions Senior Prom; Senior Sat- 
ellites. 



THOMAS DelSIGNORE 

"Tommy" 
18 Austin St. Art School 

"As free as the wandering 
breeze." 

Decoration Committee Soph- 
omore Party; Decoration Com- 
mittee Junior Party; Football 
1, 2, 3; Intramural Basketball 
1, 2, 3; Art Staff Yearbook; Sen- 
ior Party Committee; Torch 
Light Parade. 





MARILYN DOCAR 
22 Folan Ave. 



'Twinkles" 



"When joy and duty clash, 
Let duty go to smash." 

Sophomore Party Committee; 
Decoration Committee Junior 
Party; Senior Party Committee; 
Band Drive; Torch Light Pa- 
rade; Football Ticket Seller. 



JOAN DWANE 

32 Florence Ave. College 

"She is loyal of heart, high of 
purpose, and jolly of spirit." 
Entertainment Committee 
Sophomore Party; Editor Tiot 
Jr.; Class Treasurer 2, 3; Dec- 
oration Committee Junior Prom ; 
Decoration Committee Junior 
Party; Traffic Squad; Band 
Drive; Senior Party Commit- 
tee; Senior Prom Committee; 
Junior Red Cross 1, 2, 3; Usher- 
ette Senior Satellites '46; Class 
Day Committee '46. 



HELEN DONOVAN 
S2 Walpole St. 



'HeV 



"Two qualities that often blend, 
a good sport and a loyal friend." 
Ticket Committee Sophomore 
Party; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Tennis 
1, 2, 3; Archery 1, 2, 3; Torch 
Light Parade; Band Drive; 
Ticket Committee Junior Party; 
Band 1 ; Ticket Committee Sen- 
ior Reception '46. 



DOROTHY EARLE 
66 Prospect Ave. 



"Dot" 



"Delicacy is woman's strength." 
Student Council 1; Peabody 
School; Music 2; Silver Tea 2; 
Student Council Breakfast 2; 
Women's Club Tea 1. 



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VANITA EGGE 
295 Winter St. 



"Nita" 
College 



"Overflowing with merriment, 
wit and wisdom." 
Decoration Committee Soph- 
omore Party; Decoration Com- 
mittee Junior Prom; Tiot Jr. 
Staff; Co- Art Editor Yearbook; 
Torch Light Parade; Football 
Programs Committee; Cast 
Senior Play; Class Day Com- 
mittee '46; Decoration Commit- 
tee Senior Prom; Usherette 
Senior Satellites. 



SYLVIA EYSIE "Sil" 

23 Concord Ave. College 

"Mischief dances in her eyes 
and smiles upon her lips." 
Entertainment, Decoration 
Committees Sophomore Party; 
Ticket Committee Junior Prom; 
Traffic Squad; Torch Light 
Parade; Band Drive; Cheer 
Leader; Ticket Committee Class 
Play; Entertainment, Decora- 
tion Committees Junior Party; 
Class Day Committee 1946. 



ELIZABETH EKLUND "Betty" 
76 Summer St. 

"Not a flower, not a pearl, just 
a regular all-around girl." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 

Senior Party Committee; Torch 

Light Parade; Band Drive; 

Usherette Senior Play; Lunch 

Counter 2. 



ANNE FALCONER "Mike" 

25 Rock St. St. Francis Hospital 

"She must admired be." 
Entertainment, Orchestra 
Committees Sophomore Party; 
Decoration, Refreshment Com- 
mittees Junior Prom; Junior 
Party Committees; Band 1; 
Basketball 1, 3; Tennis 1, 3; 
Torch Light Parade; Cast Sen- 
ior Play; Ticket Committee 
Class Day '46; Orchestra 1, 2, 3. 





JAMES FARREN 
83 Elliot Street 



"Jim" 



the 



"Thou knowest him well, 
God of sleep." 
Torchlight Parade; Band 
Drive; Sophomore, Senior Party 
Committees. 



IDA PIETZ "Bunny" 

School St., Islington 

Cosmetologist 

"A cheerful good nature and a 
sunny smile." 



PATRICIA FIELD 
343 Prospect St. 



"Pat" 
Business 



"Her ways are ways of pleasant- 
ness, 
And all her paths are peace." 
Decoration Committee Junior 
Prom; Archery 2; Candy Com- 
mittee Senior Play. 



HELEN FITZGERALD 
32 Adams St. 



"Fitzy" 



"Music is well said to be the 
speech of angels." 
Invitation Committee Sopho- 
more Party; Basketball 3; Sen- 
ior Party Committee; Torch 
Light Parade; Ticket Commit- 
tee Senior Play; Refreshment 
Committee Junior Party. 



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JOHN FITZMORRIS "Fitzy" 
9 Clark St. College 

"In every land, great or small, 
'tis industry supports us all." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Junior Prom Committee; Band 
Drive; Torch Light Parade; 
Senior Prom Committee. 



MARGARET FLOOD 
304 Railroad Ave. 

"No taper is needed to light the 
mischief in her eyes." 
Ticket Committee Sophomore 
Party; Tiot Jr. Staff; Refresh- 
ment Committee Junior Prom; 
Ticket Committee Junior Party ; 
Home Room Rep. 3; Traffic 
Squad; Torch Light Parade, 
Refreshment Committee Class 
Day '46. 



NANCY FLECK 
141 Cottage St. 



Chandler 



"Good nature and good sense 
must ever join." 
Ticket Committee Junior 
Prom; Advertising Committee 
Yearbook; Band Drive; Ticket 
Committee Senior Play; 1946 
Class Day Committee. 



NANCY FLOWER 
40 Nichols St. 



Nursing 



"Her quiet unassuming manner 
brings forth her pleasant ways." 
Ticket Committee Sophomore 
Party; Refreshment Committee 
Junior Prom; Ticket Commit- 
tee Junior Party; Torch Light 
Parade; Class Day Committee 
'46. 




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VIRGINIA FORREST "Ginny" 
121 Walpole St. College 

"A dimple in her chin; 
A devil within." 
Decoration Committee Soph- 
cmore Party; Class Secretary 
1, 2, 3; Ticket Committee Junior 
Prom; Student Council 1, Ex. 
Board 3; Archery 1; Basketball 
1, 2, 3; Traffic Squad; Band 
Drive; Cast Senior Play; Class 
Day Committee '46; Horizon 
Club 1, 2, 3; Usherette Senior 
Satellites '46; Cheerleader; 
Yearbook Staff. 



BETTY PRIZZELL "Betty" 

260 Lenox St. Business 

"Happiness is rather to be 
chosen than great riches and 
loving favor rather than silver 
and gold." 
Secretary 3; Peabody School; 
Usherette Senior Play; Candy, 
Publicity Committees Senior 
Play. 



RICHARD PRATES "Dick" 

323 Prospect St. College 

"The force of his own merit 
makes his way." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Junior Prom Committee; En- 
tertainment Committee Junior 
Party; Torch Light Parade; 
Traffic Squad; Graduation 
Usher '46; Class Day Usher '46; 
Intramural Basketball 2, 3; 
Band Drive; Senior Play Com- 
mittee. 



DEIDRE FROST 
153 Nahatan St. 



"Nancy" 
Foods 



"A wise woman confides in few 
persons." 
Red Cross Banquet 1, 2; Sil- 
ver Tea 2 ; Cast, Peabody School 
Christmas Play; Open House 
Hostess 1, 2; Refreshment Com- 
mittee Class Day; Peabody 
School Party. 



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PAUL GALANO 
10 Tremont St. 



"P-aulie" 



"We know what we are, but not 
what we may be." 
Decoration Committee Soph- 
omore Party; Baseball 1, 2, 3; 
Intramural Basketball 1, 2; Art 
Staff Yearbook; Torch Light 
Parade; Band Drive. 



PAUL GAY "Skippy" 

28 Sturtevant Ave. College 

"An unusual blonde, faithful 
and sincere." 
Sophomore, Junior, Senior 
Party Committees; Class Treas- 
urer 2, 3; Graduation Usher; 
Junior, Senior Prom Commit- 
tees; Football 1, 2, 3; Intra- 
mural Basketball 1, 2, 3; Traf- 
fic Squad; Photography Editor 
Yearbook; Torchlight Parade; 
Cast Senior Play; Treasurer 
Spoon Club; Band Drive; Senior 
Satellites; March of Dimes 
Drive. 



ROBERT GARLAND "Bob" 

392 Pleasant St. Work 

"By nature honest 
By experience wise." 
Tiot Jr. Staff; Senior Party 
Committee; Torch Light Pa- 
rade; Member of Spoon Club. 



ARTHUR GEARTY "Art" 

59 Sycamore St. Business 

"Men of few words are the best 
men." 
Torch Light Parade; Band 
Drive; Senior Party Committee; 
Senior Prom Committee. 





HERBERT GEARTY "Herb" 
59 Sycamore St. Business 

"Good qualities, though hidden 
become unveiled, and shine 
throughout the world." 
Hockey 3; Senior Party Com- 
mittee; Senior Prom Commit- 
tee; Torch Light Parade. 



MARIE GOLDEN 
16 Warren St. 



Business 



"Gentle, sweet and friendly 
toward all." 
Refreshment Committee 
Sophomore Party; Junior Prom 
Decoration Committee; Year- 
book Committees, Advertising 
and Photography; Candy Com- 
mittee Class Play. 



JOHN GLYNN 
387 Prospect St. 



"Mickie" 
College 



"He travels fastest who travels 
alone." 
Football 1, 2; Hockey 2, 3; 
Junior Prom Committee; Senior 
Prom Committee. 



JOSEPH J. GRASSO "Joe" 

18 Dean St. Business 

"Life is just one long holiday." 
Student Council 2, 3; Foot- 
ball 1, 2, 3; Intramural Basket- 
ball 1, 2, 3; Traffic Squad; Ad- 
vertising Staff Yearbook; Class 
Gifts; Torch Light Parade; 
Spoon Club ; Band Drive ; Senior 
Satellites; Property Committee 
Senior Play; Senior Prom Re- 
freshment Committee ; Junior 
Prom, Junior Party Commit- 
tees. 



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JAMES HANLEY "Dick" 

135 Roosevelt Ave. College 

"He speaks an infinite deal of 
nothing." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Senior Party Committee ; Senior 
Prom Committee; Torch Light 
Parade; Band Drive. 



DOROTHEA HAWLEY 
24 Nichols St. 



Dottie" 
College 



"Her face betokens all things 
dear and good." 
Entertainment Committee 
Sophomore Party; Torch Light 
Parade; Advertising Committee 
Yearbook; Prop. Committee 
Senior Play. 



BARBARA HANSCOM 

"Barbie" 
1E2 Pleasant St. 

" 'Tis good to be merry and 
wise." 
Entertainment, Refreshment 
Committees Sophomore Party; 
Refreshment Committee Junior 
Party; Torch Light Parade; 
Tiot Jr. Committee; Lunch 
Counter 1, 2, 3. 



STEPHEN HEFFERAN "Steve" 
32 Lydon St. College 

"The blush is beautiful but is 
sometimes inconvenient." 
Decoration Committee Soph- 
omore Party ; Graduation Usher 
'46; Decoration Committee Jun- 
ior Prom; Intramural Basket- 
ball 1, 2, 3; Traffic Squad; 
Advertising Staff Yearbook; 
Senior Party Committee ; Senior 
Prom Committee; Band Drive; 
Cast Senior Play; Decoration 
Committee Class Day '46. 





MURIEL HIGGINS 
269 Winter St. 

Telephone Operator 

"A winning way and a pleasant 
smile." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Junior Party Committee; Torch 
Light Parade; Lunch Counter 
1, 2, 3; Senior Party Commit- 
tee. 



ELEANOR HOWE 
46 Mylod St. 



"Ellie" 
Business 



"A little girl and quite sweet 
is she. The type of girl we like 
to see." 
Refreshment, Entertainment 
Committees Sophomore Party; 
Refreshment Committee Junior 
Party; Torch Light Parade; 
Lunch Counter 1, 2, 3; Tiot Jr. 
Staff. 



MARY JANE HILLMAN "M.J." 
474 Washington St. Nursing 

"A merry twinkle of the eye, a 
sunny smile as she passes by." 
Ticket Committee Sophomore 
Party ; Class Treasurer 1 ; 
Usherette Senior Satellites '46; 
Decoration Committee Junior 
Prom; Archery 1; Basketball 3; 
Traffic Squad ; Advertising Staff 
Yearbook; Torch Light Parade; 
Band Drive; Cheerleader; Cast 
Senior Play; Ticket, Wardrobe 
Committees Senior Play; Hori- 
zon Club; Refreshment Com- 
mittee Senior Reception; Mem- 
ber of Spoon Club; Decoration 
Committee for luncheon. 



DOROTHY HOYT "Dottie" 

238 Pleasant St. 

East Walpole Cosmetologist 

"Eyes coloured like a water 
flower, 
And deeper than the green 
seas' glass." 



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MADELINE HYLAND "Hy" 

14 Charles St. College 

"We think her quiet — but things 
are not what they may seem." 
Refreshment, Entertainment 
Committees Sophomore Party; 
Decoration Committee Junior 
Prom; Refreshment, Decoration, 
Entertainment Committees 
Junior Party; Basketball 2, 3; 
Advertising Staff Yearbook; 
Band Drive; Sound Effects Sen- 
ior Play; Refreshment Commit- 
tee Class Day. 



JOAN JASIONIS 
97 Concord Ave. 



Business 



"True to her word, her work 
and her friends." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Usherette Senior Play. 



WILLIAM JANKOWSKI "Jan" 
277 Vernon St. College 

"A scintillating wit blended 
evenly with profound wisdom, 
will, carry him a long way." 
Entertainment Committee 
Sophomore Party; Decoration 
Committee Junior Prom; Grad- 
uation Usher '46; Tiot Jr. Staff; 
Yearbook Staff; Torch Light 
Parade; Cast Senior Play; Sen- 
ior Prom Decoration Commit- 
tee; Senior Satellites; Traffic 
Squad; Class Prophecy. 



JEANNETTE JOHNSON "Jay" 
18 Elliot St. College 

"Sociable and pleasant, always 
willing to laugh." 
Entertainment, Ticket Com- 
mittees Sophomore Party; Dec- 
oration, Ticket Committees 
Junior Prom; Basketball 1, 2; 
Tennis 1, 2; Archery 1; Traffic 
Squad; Advertising Committee, 
Art Staff Yearbook ; Band Drive ; 
Decoration Committee Junior 
Party; Senior Play Committee; 
Usherette for Satellites '46; Re- 
freshment Committee Class Day 
'46; Horizon Club. 





CAROL JOHNSTON "Beep" 
224 Washington St. Art School 

"Cute and small; 
Admired by all." 
Sophomore Party Decoration 
Committee; Archery 1, 2; Re- 
freshment Committee Class 
Day; Decoration Committee 
Junior, Senior Proms; Traffic 
Squad ; Cast Senior Play ; Torch 
Light Parade; Advertising Staff 
Yearbook; Ticket Committee 
Senior Play; Usherette Senior 
Satellites; Cheerleader; Spoon 
Club. 



JOHN KAVALL 
32 Willow St. 



"Crisco" 
Work 



"A man of action." 
Football 2, 3; Torch Light 
Parade; Prop. Committee Sen- 
ior Play. 



SAMUEL KALLGREN 

"Bullhead" 
39 Chapel St. College 

"The equal friend, no grudge, 
no strife." 
Football 2, 3; Intramural 
Basketball 2, 3; Torch Light 
Parade; Band Drive. 



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OGENIA KAVOLINAS 

"Jeannie" 

15 Chapel St. Art School 

"God bless the heart of sun- 
shine that smiles the clouds 
away." 



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KATHRYN KEADY "Kay" 

24 Lydon St. Business 

"She loves to laugh, she loves 
all fun, she's never quiet when 
school is begun." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Torch Light Parade; Senior 
Party Committee; Ticket Com- 
mittee Senior Play; Advertising 
Yearbook; Red Cross; Junior 
Party Committee. 



MILDRED KEIZER "Millie" 
302 Nahatan St. Business 

"Silence and modesty are very 
valuable qualities in the art of 
conversation." 
Silver Tea 2; Open House 
Hostess 2; Music 2; Christmas 
Tea 3. 



CLIFFORD KEELER "Cliff" 
392 Washington St. College 

"The big and strong have their 
appeal." 
Senior Party Committee; 
Senior Prom Committee; Torch 
Light Parade; Band Drive. 



THERESA LACASSE "Terry" 
309 Walpole St. 

"Listen, you may be allowed 
To hear my laughter from a 

cloud." 
Student Council 2, 3 Peabody 
School; Peabody School Play; 
Decoration Committee Hallow- 
een Party; Usherette Senior 
Play; Christmas Formal Com- 
mittee; Open House Usher; 
Step Party Committee; Cast of 
Christmas Play. 





PATRICIA LAMB "Pat" 

18 Irving St. Dressmaking 

"Dark eyes, charm, and intelli- 
gence well combine." 
Usherette Senior Play; Red 
Cross Rep. 2, 3; Decoration 
Committee Peabody Prom; Dec- 
oration Committee Peabody 
Party; Halloween Play; Deco- 
ration Committee Halloween 
Play; Open House Usher 1, 2, 
3; Fashion Show 1, 2, 3; Year- 
book Staff. 



ELAINE L. LOMBARDI 
71 North Park St. 

Franklin Beauty Culture 

"Music washes away from the 
soul the dust of every-day life." 
Sang and Played for Two 
Assemblies. 



MARY LATHAM "Westy" 

160 Vernon St. College 

"There is one pair of eyes that 
tease." 
Decoration Committee Soph- 
omore Party; Ticket, Decora- 
tion Committees Junior Prom; 
Decoration Committee Junior 
Party; Basketball 2, 3; Tennis 
1; Archery 1; Traffic Squad; 
Co-Editor Circulation Year- 
book ; Decoration Committee 
Senior Prom; Torch Light Pa- 
rade ; Cast Senior Play ; Horizon 
Club 1, 2, 3; Class Day Com- 
mittee '46; Usherette Senior 
Satellites '46; Football Pro- 
grams; Staff of Tot. 



STANLEY LUKAWECKI 

"Cootchie" 
1175 Washington St. Work 

"I am silent but I know gold 
from copper." 
Decoration Committee Soph- 
omore Party; Decoration Com- 
mittee Junior Prom; Intramu- 
ral Basketball 1, 2; Decoration 
Committee Senior Party; Torch 
Light Parade. 



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LINCOLN LYNCH 
21 Florence Ave. 



"Link" 
Business 



"He that inquires much learns 
much." 
Refreshment Committee 
Sophomore Party; Junior Prom 
Committee; Traffic Squad; En- 
tertainment Committee Senior 
Prom; Torch Light Parade; 
Band Drive; Band 1, 2, 3; Or- 
chestra 1, 2, 3; Rifle Club 1, 3. 



PATRICIA MacLEOD "Patty" 
176 Vernon St. Nursing 

"The sweet expression of thy 
face; forever changing, yet the 
same." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Tiot Jr. Staff; Junior Prom 
Committee; Traffic Squad; Bas- 
ketball 1, 2, 3; Advertising Com- 
mittee Yearbook; Football Pro- 
grams; Torch Light Parade; 
Senior Party Committee; Senior 
Prom Committee; Ticket Com- 
mittee Senior Play; Horizon 
Club; Usherette Senior Satel- 
lites '46; Lunch Room Ticket 
Seller; Class Day Committee '46. 



PHYLLIS MacDONALD "Phil" 
134 Cottage St. 

"Silence is the most perfect 
herald of joy." 
Red Cross Banquet 2; Music 
2; Silver Tea 2; Student Coun- 
cil Breakfast Peabody School. 



ELIZABETH MAGULRE 

"Betty" 
23 Williams St. Business 

"// a woman has long hair it is 
a glory to her." 
Decoration, Invitation Com- 
mittees Sophomore Party; Dec- 
oration Committee Junior 
Prom; Tennis 1; Archery 1; 
Torch Light Parade; Ticket 
Committee Class Play. 





JANE MAHONEY 

182 Dean St. College 

"The hand that hath made you 
fair, hath made you good." 
Decoration Committee Soph- 
omore Party; Junior Prom 
Committee; Student Council 1, 
2; Executive Board 3; Basket- 
ball 1, 2, 3; Tennis; Advertising 
Staff Yearbook; Torch Light 
Parade ; Cheerleader ; Ticket 
Committee Senior Play; Hori- 
zon Club. 



LENA MARINELLI "Lee" 

714 Pleasant St. Business 

"A sweet nature is heaven's 
gift." 
Basketball 3; Decoration 
Committee Thanksgiving Day; 
Decoration Committee Christ- 
mas Sale; Fashion Show Com- 
mittee; Glee Club; Peabody 
Formal Committee; Senior Mu- 
sical; Open House Usher. 



LELIA MARINELLI "Laddie" 
714 Pleasant St. Business 

"A merry heart goes well all 
the day." 
Basketball 3; Decoration 
Committee Thanksgiving Day; 
Decoration Committee Christ- 
mas Sale; Fashion Show Com- 
mittee; Glee Club; Peabody 
Formal Committee; Senior Mu- 
sical Committee; Usher Open 
House. 



JOHN MARONEY 
176 Dean St. 



"Jackson" 
Work 



"What pace is this that thy 
tongue keeps." 
Football 2, 3; Baseball 1, 2; 
Co-Capt. 3; Basketball 2, 3; 
Torch Light Parade; Band 
Drive. 



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WALTER MARTOWSKA 

"Wally" 
16 Lewis Ave. 

"For courage mounteth with 
occasion." 
Basketball 1, 2, 3; Intramural 
Basketball; Torch Light Pa- 
rade; Band Drive. 



ROBERT MATTSON "Sonny" 
33 Dean St. College 

"A spotless friend, a matchless 
man, whose virtues ever shone." 
A. A. Council 3; Decoration 
Committee Sophomore Party; 
Decoration Committee Junior 
Prom; Football 1, 2, Co-Capt. 3 
Basketball 1, 2, Co-Capt. 3 
Track 1, 2, Capt. 3; Baseball 3 
Traffic Squad; Senior Party 
Committee; Torch Light Pa- 
rade; Band Drive; Senior Play. 



RAYMOND MASCE "Ray" 

63 Adams St. 

Burdett Business School 

"To take things as they be, 
that's my philosophy." 
Graduation Usher '46; Senior 
Play Committee; Senior Prom 
Committee; Torch Light Parade; 
Band Drive. 



MARGARET McGRATH "Peg" 
98 Mylod St. Business 

"A form more fair, a face more 

sweet 
Ne'er hath it been my lot to 

meet." 
Red Cross Thanksgiving Dec- 
oration Committee ; Fashion 
Show Committee; Glee Club; 
Peabody Formal Committee ; 
Senior Musicale; Hobby Class; 
Usher for Open House; Year- 
book Committee. 





SYLVESTER McNEIL "Mac" 
58 Elliott St. Business School 

"He was wont to speak plain 
and to the purpose." 
Football 2; Football Manager 
3; Advertising Committee Year- 
book; Torch Light Parade; 
Band Drive; Senior Play; Re- 
freshment Committee Class Day 
'46; President of Spoon Club. 



CHARLES McTERNAN 

"Mickey Mouse" 

33 North Ave. Prep School 

"Men go farthest when they are 
smoothest." 
Class President 1; Entertain- 
ment Committee Sophomore 
Party; Hockey 1, 2, 3; Football 
1, 2, 3; Baseball 3; Track 1, 3; 
Traffic Squad; Co-Editor Ad- 
vertising, Yearbook ; Senior 
Party Committee; Senior Prom 
Committee; Torch Light Pa- 
rade; Band Drive; Senior Play. 



JOSEPH McNULTY "Joe" 

159 Pleasant St. College 

"He comes suddenly upon us 
like thunder on a summer's 
day." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Junior Prom Committee; Senior 
Party Committee; Senior Prom 
Committee; Torch Light Pa- 
rade. 



MARY ANNE MEADE 

89 Carroll Ave. 

Islington Cosmetologist 

"What is true, simple and sin- 
cere is most congenial to her 
nature." 



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JANE I. MILLIKEN "Jim" 

151 Cottage St. 

Carson Jr. College 

"Gentle thou art and therefore 
to be won." 
Sophomore, Junior, Senior 
Party Committees; Archery 1; 
Advertising Committee Year- 
book; Decoration Committee 
Senior Prom; Property Commit- 
tee Senior Play; Senior Recep- 
tion. 



JEAN MINKEVITCH "Minky" 
26 Folan Ave. Nursing 

"Of generous hand and heart 
sincere." 
Decoration Committee Soph- 
omore Party; Decoration Com- 
mittee Junior Prom; Basketball 
3; Tennis 3; Advertising Com- 
mittee Yearbook; Torch Light 
Parade; Ticket Committee Sen- 
ior Play. 



HELEN MILLS "Millsy" 

5 Atwood Ave. Business School 

"Silence often says more than 
words." 
Decoration Committee Soph- 
omore Party; Band Drive; 
Torch Light Parade; Senior 
Party Committee. 



CHRISTINE MORGAN "Chris" 
93 Railroad Ave. Foods 

"Happiness consists in the in- 
stitution of good habits." 
Refreshment Committee 
Sophomore Party; Student 
Council Peabody School; Red 
Cross Banquet 2 ; Christmas Tea 
2, 3; Open House 1, 2, 3; Hal- 
loween Party 3. 





MARIE MUCCIARONE 

"Chubby" 

31 Cleveland Ave. 

Franklin Dressmaking 

"Never changing, always 
pleasing." 
Basketball; Decoration Com- 
mittee Christmas Sale Peabody 
School; Decoration Committee, 
Halloween Party. 



ANDREW YELAPI 
35 Sturtevant Ave. 



"Andy" 
U. S. Navy 



"His ways are ways of pleasant- 
ness." 
Decoration Committee Soph- 
omore Party; Graduation Usher 
'46; Decoration Committee Jun- 
ior Prom; Student Council 1; 
Football 1, 2, 3; Basketball 1, 2, 
3; Baseball 1, 2, 3; Intramural 
Basketball 1, 2, 3; Art Staff 
Yearbook; Senior Party Com- 
mittee; Senior Prom Committee; 
Torch Light Parade; Member 
of Spoon Club. 



PAULINE MUCCIARONE 

"Debbie" 

123 Cottage St. 

Franklin Dressmaking 

"Her sunny smile and winsome 

ways, 
We shall remember all our 

days." 
Basketball 3; Decoration 
Committee for Halloween Party 
Peabody School; Decoration 
Committee Peabody Christmas 
Sale. 



THERESA M. MULKERN 

36 Berwick Road Cosmetologist 

"As sweet a girl, as true a friend, 
as ever could be found." 
Fashion Show 1, 2; Christmas 
Sale and Tea; Representative 
to High School and Peabody 
Student Cooperative Associa- 
tions. 



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JACQUELINE NARDUCCI 

"Jackie" 

21 St. George Ave. Business 

"As soon be out of the world as 
out of fashion." 
Decoration Committee Soph- 
omore Party; Decoration Com- 
mittee Junior Prom; Torch 
Light Parade; Ticket Commit- 
tee; Usherette Senior Play. 



AUDREY NEAD 
48 Rosemary St. 



Colby 



"Ambition has no rest." 
Ticket Committee Sophomore 
Party ; Archery 2 ; Tennis 3 ; Ad- 
vertising Staff Yearbook; Torch 
Light Parade; Band Drive; 
Ticket Committee Junior Party; 
Prop. Committee Senior Play; 
Ticket Committee Class Day 
'46; Orchestra 1. 



MARY NAUGHTON "Sis" 

310 Railroad Ave. Work 

"Thou hast wit, fun and fire." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Red Cross 1 ; Junior Party Com- 
mittee; Ticket Committee Sen- 
ior Play; Advertising Staff 
Yearbook; Torchlight Parade; 
Senior Prom Committee. 



ANASTASIA NIKITUK 

"Natsa" 
60 Heaton Ave. 

"Personality, a gleaming smile, 
an active mind, a friend worth- 
while." 
Decoration Committee Soph- 
omore Party; Traffic Squad; 
Torch Light Parade; Captain 
Cheerleaders ; Senior Party 
Committee; Senior Prom Com- 
mittee. 





JANE NORDBLOM "Norby" 
396 Winter St. Business School 

"Stay as sweet as you are, 
Let nothing ever change you." 
Junior Prom Decoration Com- 
mittee; Student Council 1, 3; 
Torch Light Parade; Float 
Committee for Spoon Club and 
Student Council; Spoon Club; 
Advertising Committee for 
Yearbook. 



CHARLOTTE OAKES "Dolly" 

171 Neponset St. 

Interior Decorating 

"She is full of smiles and ready 
for fun." 
Football, Baseball, Basketball 
Ticket Committees; Photogra- 
phy Committee Yearbook ; 
Torch Light Parade ; Member of 
Spoon Club; Ticket, Candy 
Committees Senior Play. 



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CARYL A. NORTON "Slim" \ 

862 Washington St. Art College y 



"Tall and stately, nice and j) 
sweet, 
The type of girl we like to 

meet." 
Refreshment Committee 
Sophomore Party; Senior Ush- 
erette at Peabody Open House; 
Decoration Committee Christ- 
mas Sale. 



"Good appearance is a great 
recommendation in the business 
of mankind." 
Ticket Committee Sophomore 
Party; Ticket Committee Junior 
Party; Tennis 1; Basketball 1. 



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MARY O'CONNOR 

"Mary Ellen" 3 
25 Oak Road Business (i. 



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DOROTHY O'DONNELL 

"Dotty" 

105 Hill St. Business 

"/ am always in haste, but never 
in a hurry." 
Decoration Committee Soph- 
omore Party; Basketball 3; Ad- 
vertising Committee Yearbook; 
Ticket Committee Senior Prom; 
Torch Light Parade. 



MARGARET O'DONNELL 

"Sis" 

105 Hill St. Dressmaking 

"Smiling lips and sharp, bright 
eyes." 
Fashion Show Committee; 
Red Cross, Christmas Sale Com- 
mittee; Glee Club; Peabody 
Formal Committee ; Open House 
Usherette. 




EILEEN O'SULLIVAN "Irish" 
26 Winfield St. 

"Cut as they make them, sweet 
as they come." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Junior Party Committee; Junior 
Prom Committee; Class Day 
Committee '46; Ticket, Prop. 
Committees Senior Play; Foot- 
ball Programs; Senior Prom 
Committee; Torch Light Pa- 
rade; Photography Staff Year- 
book. 



THERESA O'TOOLE "Tessy" 
21 Elliot St. Business 

"A face with gladness over- 
spread! 
Soft smiles, by human kind- 
ness bred!" 
Tiot Jr. Committee; Sopho- 
more Party Committee; Junior 
Prom Committee; Peabody 
School Formal; Band Drive. 





EUGENE PALAZZI "Gene" 

10 St. Joseph Ave. 

Orchestral Work 

"It's not what we do, but how 
we do it that counts." 
Refreshment Committee 
Sophomore Party; Senior Party 
Committee; Band Drive. 



GLORIA PEARLMAN 
1003 Washington St. 



College 



ROBERT PERKINS "Perk" 
78 Cross St. Army 

"Nothing is more useful than 
silence." 
Senior Party Committee ; 
Senior Prom Committee; Torch 
Light Parade. 



"An intellectual kingdom all 
her own." 



IRENE PERNIOLA "Renie" 
38 Elliot St. College 

"For all that life can rate worth 
name of life, in thee hath esti- 
mate youth, beauty, wisdom, 
courage, virtue, all!" 
Co-Editor-in-Chief of Year- 
book; Student Council 1; Exec- 
utive Board 2; Recording Sec- 
retary 3; Election Commission 

1, 2, Chairman 3; Traffic Squad 
Lieutenant; Football Programs 

2, Chairman 3; Staff of Tiot 
Jr.; Archery 1; Basketball 2, 3; 
Prompter Class Play; Sopho- 
more, Junior, Senior Party 
Committees; Junior, Senior 
Prom Committees ; Candy Chair- 
man Senior Satellites; Class 
Day Committee; Band Drive; 
Torch Light Parade Committee. 



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GRACE PUOPOLO "Grade" 
18 Concord Ave. Business 

"Gentleness, cheerfulness, and 
politeness are the three graces 
of manner." 
Home Room Rep. Peabody 
School; Peabody School Formal 
Committee. 



VERONICA RAYMOND 

"Ronnie" 

24 Shaw St. Cosmetologist 

"Her eyes are full of laughter 
that bubble over on occasion." 



JEANETTE RABINOVITZ 

"Jen" 
923 Washington St. College 

"Dark and vivacious. 
Sweet and gracious." 
Entertainment Committee 
Sophomore Party; Decoration 
Committee Junior Prom; Junior 
Party Committee; Tiot Jr. 
Committee; Tennis 2, 3; Art 
Staff; Advisory Board Year- 
book; Torch Light Parade; 
Band Drive; Decoration Com- 
mittee Senior Party ; Decoration 
Committee Senior Prom; 
Prompter Class Play; Election 
Commission 3; Class Day Com- 
mittee '46. 



RICHARD REYNOLDS 



104 Monroe St. 



'Richie" 
Work 



"Two qualities that often blend: 
a good sport and a loyal friend." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Football 1, 2; Senior Party Com- 
mittee; Torch Light Parade. 





JOHN RILEY 
24 Monroe St. 



"Jack" 
College 



"Wit makes its own welcome." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Tiot Jr. Staff; Junior Prom 
Committee; Hockey 3; Gradu- 
ation Usher '46; Traffic Squad; 
Torch Light Parade; Student 
Council 1; Executive Board 2. 



MURIEL ROWEN 
20 Pleasant Ct. 



"She seems a quiet soul but 
then, who knows?" 
Red Cross Banquet; Music 2; 
Silver Tea; Student Council 
Breakfast. 



ROBERT RIZZO "Bob" 

544 Neponset St. College 

"A head to contrive, a tongue 
to persuade, and a hand to 
execute." 
Refreshment Committee 
Sophomore Party; Decoration, 
Refreshment Committees Jun- 
ior Prom; Traffic Squad; Pho- 
tography Committee Yearbook; 
Decoration Committee Senior 
Prom; Torch Light Parade; 
Cast Senior Play. 



JOHN RUDVILOVITCH 

"Chico" 
23 Dean St. 

"Do not let the good things of 
life rob you of the best things." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Football 1, 2, 3; Basketball 1, 2, 
3; Intramural Basketball 1, 3; 
Senior Party Committee; Senior 
Prom Committee; Torch Light 
Parade; Senior Play Committee. 



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RICHARD SAGER "Dick" 

96 Lincoln St. College 

"A good mind is Lord of a 
Kingdom." 
Vice President 3; Tiot Jr. 
Staff; Decoration, Ticket Com- 
mittees Sophomore Party; 
Graduation Usher; Decoration, 
Ticket Committees Junior 
Prom; Executive Board Student 
Council 3; Track 1, 2, 3; Traffic 
Squad; Advisory Board Year- 
book; Football Programs; Sen- 
ior Party Committee; Senior 
Prom Committee; Torch Light 
Parade; Band Drive; Ticket, 
Lighting Committees Senior 
Play; Senior Satellites '46. 



ANNA SANTORO 
38 Sunset Ave. 



"Pudgy" 
Furrier 



"J never dare to be as funny as 
I can." 
A. A. Council 3; Band Drive; 
Decoration Committee Peabody 
School Party; Torch Light Pa- 
rade; Cast of Peabody School 
Play ; Decoration Committee 
Peabody Play; Ticket Seller 2, 
3; Salesgirl Peabody School 
Bazaar; Decoration Committee 
Peabody School Formal; Cast 
Christmas Play. 



MARION SALLOOM "Bunny" 
38 Dean St. College 

"Let any man speak long and 
he will get believers." 
Entertainment Committee 
Sophomore Party ; Decoration 
Committee Junior Prom; Deco- 
ration Committee Junior Party; 
Torch Light Parade; Ticket 
Seller 1, 2, 3; Basketball 1; Pho- 
tography Committee, Advertis- 
ing Committee Yearbook; Ticket 
Committee Senior Prom. 



MARY SANTORA 
38 Sunset Ave. 



"Tears" 



"Witty and clever, and full of 
life." 
Treasurer 1, 2, Peabody 
School; Refreshment Commit- 
tee Peabody Formal; Home 
Room Rep. 1; Refreshment 
Committee Peabody Sale; Mu-- 
sic 2, 3. 





FRANCIS SEASTRAND 

"Shotgun" 
1367 Washington St. 

Prep School 

"To love the game beyond the 
price." 
Student Council 3; Football 
1, 2, Co-Capt. 3; Hockey 2, Capt. 
3; Baseball 2, 3; Track 3; Traf- 
fic Squad; Intramural Basket- 
ball 1, 2, 3; Member of Spoon 
Club. 



CHRISTINE SIRONKA "Chris" 
14 Quincy Ave. Nursing 

"The silent countenance often 
speaks." 
Basketball 1; Archery 1; Ten- 
nis 1; Torch Light Parade; 
Prop. Committee Senior Play. 



JOANNA SIDEROPOULOS 

"Jo" 
47 Cottage St. College 

"Charms strike the sight but 
merits win the soul." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Traffic Squad; Lunch Counter; 
Photography, Advertising Com- 
mittees Yearbook; Candy Com- 
mittee Senior Play; Decoration, 
Entertainment Committees Sen- 
ior Party; Torch Light Parade. 



ANN SMITH "Smithy" 

60 Prospect St. 

Commercial Food 

"Her smiling eyes where simple 
truth is stored." 
Student Council 1; Red Cross 
Banquet 2; Christmas Tea 2; 
Silver Tea 2; Red Cross Tea 3; 
Music 2, 3. 



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EDWARD STACEY "Ed" 

81 Chapel St. Hair Styling 

"Good breeding shows itself 
most, where to an ordinary eye 
it appears the least." 
Sophomore Party Entertain- 
ment Committee; Junior Prom 
Decoration Committee. 



MARGARET STEVENS 

"Peggy" 
9 K Street Dressmaking 

"Carefree, vivacious with never 
a dull moment." 
Decoration, Refreshment 
Committees Sophomore Party; 
Ticket, Refreshment Commit- 
tees Senior Party; Decoration 
Committee Senior Prom; Torch 
Light Parade; Band Drive; 
Candy Committee Senior Play; 
Lunch Counter 2, 3. 



LORRAINE STAFFORD 

"Lorrie" 

19 Dean St. Business 

"Full of fun where'er she -goes, 
making merry but never woe." 
Entertainment, Decoration 
Committees Sophomore Party; 
Decoration Committee Junior 
Party; Photography Committee 
Yearbook; Torch Light Parade; 
Football, Basketball Ticket 
Seller ; Senior Party Committee ; 
Ticket Committee Senior Pto,; 
Archery. 

MARILYN STIMSON "Merry" 
17 Berwick PI. College 

"Forward and 'frolic glee was 
there, the will to do, the soul 
to dare." 
Entertainment, Decoration 
Committees Sophomore Party; 
Decoration Committee Junior 
Prom; Usherette Junior Prom; 
Tennis 1, 2, 3; Archery 1; Bas- 
ketball 1, 2, 3; Traffic Squad; 
Band Drive; Advertising, Art 
Staff Yearbook; Senior Party 
Committee; Decoration Com- 
mittee Senior Prom; Cast Sen- 
ior Play; Horizon Club 1, 2, 3; 
Usherette Senior Satellites. 





JOHN SULLIVAN "Moose" 

20 Cross St. Business School 

"I strove with none, for none 
was worth my while." 
Ticket Committee Sophomore 
Party; Hockey 1, 2, 3; Intra- 
mural Basketball 1; Decoration 
Committee Senior Party; Ticket 
Committee Senior Prom; Torch 
Light Parade; Member Spoon 
Club. 



ROBERT TAUBER 
32 Earl St. 



Work 



"My wealth is health and per- 
fect ease." 
Track 1, 2, 3; Band Drive; 
Torch Light Parade; Member 
of Spoon Club. 



BERNARD SYKES "Troj" 

125 Bond St. Dartmouth 

"He is a man, taking him all in 
all, we shall not look upon his 
like again." 
Class President 3 ; Mass. Boys' 
State; Student Council 1, Vice 
President 2, Exec. Board 3; Vice 
President Eastern Mass. Assn. 
Student Councils; Sophomore 
Party Committee; Junior Party 
Committee; Senior Party Com- 
mittee; Co-Editor Yearbook; 
Band Drive; Torch Light Pa- 
rade; Football 1, 2, 3; Basket- 
ball 1, 2, Co-Captain 3; Traffic 
Squad; Football Programs; Cast 
Senior Play ; Track 1 ; Editor 
Tot, Tiot Jr. 

BERTHA TRUSAUSKIS "Bert" 
41 Walnut Ave. Business School 

"She moves a goddess and she 
looks a queen." 
Decoration Committee Soph- 
omore Party; Invitation Com- 
mittee Junior Party; Tennis; 
Traffic Squad; Advertising 
Committee Yearbook ; Senior 
Party Committee; Ticket Com- 
mittee Senior Prom; Usherette 
Senior Play; Usherette Senior 
Satellites '46. 



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JEAN TRAVERS 
299 Nahatan St. 



"Jeanie" 



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"If I do now a friendship I'll 
perform it to the end." 
Student Council 2; Music 2, 
3 ; Silver Tea 2 ; Red Cross Ban- 
quet 2 ; Christmas Tea 2 ; Model 
for Fashion Show 1, 2. 



FLORENCE WALKER "Flo" 
104 Pleasant St. College 

"// laughter were a crime, she 
a master criminal would be." 
Entertainment, Decoration 
Committees Sophomore Party; 
Decoration, Refreshment Com- 
mittees Junior Prom; Horizon 
Club; Basketball 3; Archery 1, 
2; Tennis 1; Photography, Ad- 
vertising Committees Yearbook; 
Band Drive; Torch Light Pa- 
rade; Decoration Committee 
Senior Prom; Cast Senior Play., 



RENA VENTEROSA "Dolly" 
1015 Washington St. College 

"A constant friend is a thing 
rare and hard to find." 
Entertainment, Refreshment 
Committees Sophomore Party; 
A. A. Council 2, 3; Decoration 
Committee, Usherette Junior 
Prom; Tennis 1, 2, 3; Basket- 
ball 1, 2, 3; Archery 1, 2; Traf- 
fic Squad; Senior Party Com- 
mittee; Senior Prom Commit- 
tee; Torch Light Parade; Mem- 
ber of Spoon Club ; Ticket Com- 
mittee Senior Play; Ticket 
Seller; Usherette Senior Satel- 
lites '46. 

WILLIAM WALKER "Bill" 

110 Lincoln St. 

"Our thoughts and our conduct 
are our own." 
Sophomore Party Committee; 
Intramural Basketball ; Senior 
Prom Committee; Senior Party 
Committee; Band Drive. 





FRANCIS WALL 
30 Mylod St. 



"Sails" 
Prep School 



"All men have faults; too much 
modesty is his." 
Hockey 1, 2, 3; Baseball 1, 2, 
3; Football 1, 2, 3; Intramural 
Basketball 1, 2, 3; Track 3; 
Torch Light Parade. 



ELEANOR WEATHERBEE 

"Ellie" 
1045 High St., 
Westwood Foods 

"Her sunny locks hang on her 
temples like a golden fleece." 
Peabody Class Officer 3 ; 
Christmas Sale; Christmas Tea; 
Red Cross Tea; Silver Tea. 



JOSEPH WALL 
30 Mylod St. 



"Joe" 
Prep School 



"One man is as good as an- 
other — and a great deal better." 
Decoration Committee Junior 
Prom; Hockey 2, 3; Football 1, 
3; Baseball 2, 3; Member Spoon 
Club; Senior Prom Committee; 
Torch Light Parade. 



MARILYN WEBSTER 

"Webby" 
329 Winter St. Colby Junior 

"Her quiet nature seems to be, 
tuned to each season's har- 
mony." 
Decoration Committee Junior 
Prom; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Tennis 
2; Art StafE Yearbook; Band 
Drive; Entertainment Commit- 
tee Junior Prom; Prop. Com- 
mittee Senior Play; Band 2, 3; 
Orchestra 2, 3; Refreshment 
Committee Junior Party; Re- 
freshment Committee Senior 
Reception. 




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CLAIRE MARIE WELCH 

63 Elliott St. Business 

"I came, I saw, I conga'd." 
Entertainment, Decoration, 
Refreshment Committees Soph- 
omore Party; Decoration, En- 
tertainment Committees Junior 
Party; Decoration, Entertain- 
ment Committees Senior Party; 
Decoration Committee Junior 
Prom; Band Drive; Senior Play 
Committee; Torch Light Pa- 
rade ; Refreshment Committee 
Class Day '46; Usherette Senior 
Satellites '46. 

JANICE WHEELER "Jan" 

68 Cypress St. Sargent 

"Nothing great was achieved 
without enthusiasm." 
Entertainment, Decoration 
Committees Sophomore Party; 
Decoration Committee Junior 
Prom; A. A. Council 1; Tiot Jr. 
Staff; Archery 1, 2; Tennis 1, 
2, 3; Traffic Squad; Co-Editor 
Advertising Staff Yearbook ; 
Band Drive; Horizon Club 1, 2, 
3; Senior Party Committee; 
Senior Prom Committee; Cast 
Senior Play. 



BARBARA WENZEL "Taffy" 
46 Chapel St. 

"A smile is ever the most bright 
and beautiful conversation." 
Red Cross Banquet 2; Christ- 
mas Tea 2; Open House 1, 2; 
Music 2; Banquet for Class '45; 
Silver Tea 2. 



PAYTON WILLIAMSON 

"Snapshot" 
5 Carpenter St. College 

"He that brings sunshine into 
the lives of others, cannot keep 
it from himself." 
Refreshment, Publicity and 
Ticket Committees of Sopho- 
more Party; Graduation Usher; 
Photography Editor of Year- 
book; Football Programs; Dec- 
oration and Ticket Committees 
Senior Prom; Torch Light Pa- 
rade; Ticket and Publicity 
Committee Chairman of Class 
Play; Tot, Tiot Jr.; Band Drive; 
Class Day Usher. 





ERNEST WOHLER "Ernie" 

341 Washington St. College 

"Much wisdom goes with fewest 
words." 
Baseball 2, 3; Intramural 
Baseball 1; Intramural Basket- 
ball 1, 2, 3; Hockey 3; Torch 
Light Parade; Publicity Com- 
mittee Senior Play. 



WILLIAM WRAGG "Bill" 

51 Second St. Business 

"A good ship asks deep water." 
Graduation Usher '46; Deco- 
ration Committee Sophomore 
Party; Student Council 1, 2; 
Football 2 ; Track 2 ; Intramural 
Basketball 1; Band Drive. 



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It is with sincere best wishes for speedy recovery that we include 
Margaret Valerio in our Senior Roster. We feel sure that with her cheer- 
fulness and enthusiasm she will not be long in making a recovery. 



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MARGARET VALERIO 
21 St. John Ave. 

"Pleasure and action make the 
hours seem short." 
Band Drive; Torchlight Pa- 
rade; Sophomore Ticket and 
Decoration Committee; Junior 
Prom Committee; Photography; 
Usher for Senior Satellites; Red 
Cross Committee. 





Most Popular 
Ben Sykes 
Virginia Forrest 



Most Athletic 

Rena Venterosa 
Francis Seastrand 



Wittiest 

Marion Salloom 
Jack Riley 



S&ni&i. 



Best Dancers 
Bob Mattson 
Sylvia Eysie 




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Class Flirts 

Paul Camelio 
Steve Hefferan 
Anne Falconer 
Marion Curran 



Done Most for Class 
Irene Perniola 
Ben Sykes 




Best Looking 

Jeanette Rabinovitz 
Ted Campisano 
Janet Blasenak 
Gerry Davis 



Most Versatile 
Jane Mahoney 
Ben Sykes 
Irene Perniola 




Best Dressed 

Bertha Trusauskis 
Payton Williamson 
Paul Gay 



Most Scholarly 
Ed Costello 
Florence Chase 
George Boyden 




Cutest 

Virginia Forrest 
Ed Cisternelli 




Most Likely to Succeed 
Ben Sykes 
Ed Costello 
Irene Perniola 
Dick Sager 




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'Act!. DENT'' 



Are You Kiddin7 



^ - 




PEABODY SCHOOL 



(P&abodi^ dU&Ioto^ 



We're breathless . . . after racing through our Senior year we take 
time out to think of . . . September . . . Wiping our feet on the Welcome Mat 
. . . Sis O'Donnell arriving and on time . . . our looking over the fresh crop of 
Sophs and Juniors — we would reap the harvest . . . the girls in Beauty 
Culture bragging about the boy in their class — Eddie "Oh-say" Stacey — not 
bragging about his success at getting in their hair . . . Miss Simpson worry- 
ing because of double trouble again — The return of our twins, Lina and 
Lelia Marinelii . . . her one consolation — Marie Mucciarone . . . October . . . 
and elections . . . the Hallowe'en Party . . . the "Frankie and Johnnie" skit 
proving to be rugged — er-ragged . . . "Doin' What Comes Naturally" not 
lacking anything in wit and originality . . . the Foods class reigning with 
their rendition of "Sunshine" . . . Ellie Weatherbee's interpretation of Nellie 
Bly . . . how can we forget Regina Cormier's witty remarks — well, remarks 
anyway . . . November . . . the Dedhamites heated debate over who would 
win the Thanksgiving game — who won the game . . . Turkey Dinner being 
served by the teachers . . . Miss Patey in an oversized apron . . . December 
. . . the Christmas Sale and Tea . . . Terry Lacasse's episode with the mur- 
esco . . . Dotty Earle as hostess at the tea . . . the decorations depicting 
Christmas scenes in foreign lands . . . the Christmas Party — "Christmas at 
Bracebridge Hall" . . . Caryl Norton, as Lord Bracebridge, frantically stitch- 
ing away at her costume . . . Jane Bergman, as Major Domo, in fencing 
tights and plumed hat . . . sharp . . . Elaine Lombardi's singing "Cantique 
de Noel" beautifully . . . reacting old English traditions— the Boar's head, 
the flaming Plum Pudding, the Wassail Bowl, the Yule Log, the Jester . . . 
the Voice Training Class singing carols through the Halls . . . Mildred 
Keizer's square dancing group . . . our Banquet — here again the teachers 
serving the students . . . good idea . . . last but not least, good old Santa 
Claus — with Anna Santoro perspiring under her St. Nick garb and beard 
. . . opening presents . . . home for a much-needed vacation . . . back in Janu- 
ary starting the year off right . . . resolutions . . . excitement over the coming 
Winter Formal . . . date set for January 31st .. . swell orchestra . . . Patty 
Lamb's disappearing act . . . the mess making gilded snowflakes . . . aching 
bones from climbing ladders . . . changing lights . . . the big night . . . Mary 
Boulis arriving with a Tuft's man — ooh, these College boys . . . molded ice 
punch bowl . . . the Grand March . . . buffet supper . . . stag line of boys from 
N. H. S. . . . talk afterward proving the Formal was a great success . . . 
getting down to business again . . . February . . . sighs over Mac McNeil and 
Dick Boch . . . morale builders . . . Valentines Day — sending roses in appreci- 
ation of services rendered at Formal . . . Commercial Department's taking a 
trip to Needham . . . Roux hair dyeing demonstration . . . excursions to 
Red Cross Center in Boston . . . Mrs. Goepner's dramatic version of Abe 
Lincoln . . . Foods Department's trip . . . vacation . . . March . . . the Prof's 
statement that Bostonians are still fighting the battle of Bunker Hill . . . Ida 
Fietz looking for Mickey . . . Mary Santoro's "heart troubles" . . . Betty 
Frizzell's embarrassing moment . . . The Student government Board's going 
to Medfield as Miss Marcionette's guests to see a play at Medfield High . . . 
Muriel Rowen's skating exhibition at the Boston Gardens . . . Pauline 
Mucciarone's crush on some handsome senior boy . . . the Franklin girls 
waiting for the train to come in . . . April . . . and "Suppressed Desires" — 
a play by the Special English girls having us "psyched" . . . being warned 
by Report Cards . . . modeling our Easter suits right out of Vogue — longer 
jackets and skirts — oh, gee . . . May . . . Open House — what a mad rush . . . 
June . . . the big month . . . the Step Party . . . the Picnic . . . Class Day . . . 
the Banquet . . . and finally Graduation . . . and now just memories of the 
class of '47. 

Anna Santoro 
Jane Bergman 



CIoaa* Offlk&Lbu 




Sitting — Jane Bergman, President; Anna Santoro, A. A. Council. 
Kneeling — Betty Frizzell, Secretary; Prudence Pelletier, Vice-President; Eleanor 
Weatherbee, Treasurer. 



(P&abodi^ Jaailh^ 




Left to right, first row — Miss McCready, Miss Blanche Marcionette, Mrs. Goepner. 

Second row — Miss Croft, Miss Morrison, Miss Riley, Mrs. Marcoux, Mrs. Weeks, Miss Patey, Miss 

Pacheco. 
Missing — Miss Simpson, Mrs. Burrows. 




FOOD DEPARTMENT 

Training based on occupa- 
tional opportunities in the 
preparation and serving of 
food is provided in this pro- 
gram. Food training from the 
viewpoint of the homemaker 
may be another object. 



BEAUTY CULTURE 

In recent years Beauty Cul- 
ture has achieved the status of 
big business. Skilled workers 
in this field are in great de- 
mand, working conditions are 
good and remuneration is 
relatively superior. Oppor- 
tunities for the establishment 
of an independent business 
are excellent. 



BUSINESS 

The desirable employment 
opportunities in the steno- 
graphic field are worth care- 
ful consideration. This work 
requires special aptitudes and 
skills. Every effort is made 
to help prospective students 
decide upon the particular 
training for which they are 
best adapted. 



JidivuL (pJwApadtA. 



JuiWtSL (p/WAfwddu 



ART DEPARTMENT 

The students in the related 
art classes develop their abil- 
ities to fit in with the trade 
which they are studying. 



DRESSMAKING 

Trade Dressmaking is still 
a fascinating and remunera- 
tive field. It changes continu- 
ally in keeping with the 
demands of fashion and modes 
of living. 



MENU PLANNING 

This course trains girls to 
plan, cook, and serve cafeteria 
meals. 








r\r>uiAyi: •■;:«— *- 



On December 19, 1946, the Christmas 
Party was carried on to represent the cele- 
bration of Christmas in Old England. The 
Lord and Lady presided over the banquet 
and students participated in many types of 
entertainment fitting to the occasion. After 
the banquet the American way of celebrat- 
ing with Santa Claus and presents was 
carried out and carols were sung. 





tOini&A, J-joAmaL 

On January 31, 1947, our Winter 
Formal was held at the school. The decor- 
ations transformed the hall into a winter 
wonderland. The outstanding features 
were the music of Fred Pierce's Orchestra, 
the Grand March, the unique punch bowl, 
and the delicious buffet supper. 




Left to right — M. Cappucino, C. Morgan, T. La Casse, H. Downey, G. Puopolo, M. Bilotta, A. Santoro, 
B. Frizzell, J Bergman (President), E. Weatherbee, M. Boulis, E. Gregory, T. Mulkern, J. Nardin, 
L. Staples, W. Benjamin, M. Davis. 



SiudsmL Qo-Qp&haiwsL (hjiociaiiovL 

Memborable Minutes of our Meetings . . . after elections finding that 
our officers were Jane Bergman, president; Prue Pelletier, vice-president; 
Betty Frizzell, secretary; Ellie Weatherbee, treasurer . . . completing the 
Board by electing one girl to represent each class . . . first meeting, October 
tenth . . . Miss Veronica Simpson and Mrs. Helen Geopner, our faculty 
advisers . . . finding their assistance invaluable . . . making plans in October 
for our Hallowe'en Party . . . electing Anna Santoro to A. A. Council . . . 
the Christmas Sale and Tea . . . feeling proud because profits were above 
those of previous year . . . buzzing about decorating the halls . . . coming 
back from vacation all enthused about the Winter Formal . . . opening the 
Formal to all classes . . . making arrangements for the orchestra . . . deciding 
on decorations . . . controversy over Stag Line . . . photographer . . . head- 
aches . . . January 31st .. . the Big Event . . . the Formal being perfection 
. . . settling down to business again . . . plans for Lounge Room . . . thinking 
about school colors and pins . . . and coming events . . . Mac MacNeil's visit 
. . . his plea for contributions to March of Dimes . . . ought to have men 
at meetings more often . . . Valentine's Day . . . our sending roses in appreci- 
ation of services rendered at Formal . . . Open House in May . . . the School 
Party and Picnic in June . . . graduation and summer vacation . . . looking 
forward to another year . . . remembering that Forty-seven's Board will be 
hard to top . . . thanking all students for their co-operation . . . the Faculty 
for their help . . . Miss Marcionette for all her interest . . . we leave . . . but 
our memories linger . . . 




/OIVJTIES 



filcuf JimsL 



The abundant theatrical talents of the Class 
of '47 were displayed in all their glory on the 
nights of December 13th and 14th of 1946. "Best 
Foot Forward," a merry and lively comedy, 
brought many Norwoodites to the Junior High 
School Auditorium to applaud the would-be Thes- 
pians. The play was a success both dramatically 
and financially; and as the curtain went down for 
the last time, we felt that we had done '47 proud. 
"Best Foot Forward" was one of the most success- 
ful productions ever staged by a Senior Class. 

We shall long remember the six weeks' prep- 
aration for our big production . . . the rehearsals 
where we struggled to learn our lines, munched 
crackers and Furlong's chocolates, scrapped with 
the janitors at the Junior High who didn't appre- 
ciate our artistic attempts to re-decorate the 
scenery, and danced behind the scenes, as Steve 





and Madink lived up to their reputation of class 
flirts. We shall recall with chuckles the. time the 
prompters were suddenly "in the act," as the cur- 
tains were pulled the wrong way . . . the laughs 
Vanita drew as she portrayed "The Blind Date" 
to perfection . . . Mattson's continual performance 
with his yo-yo . . . the last-minute changes in 
lines and costumes; and all the other hilarious 
events that followed the tryouts. We shall never 
forget the time the extras entered at the wrong 
moment . . . the handkerchief act pulled by 
Madink in the last performance . . . Johnny 
Kavall's sound effects . . . Sager's difficulty with 
the lighting . . . Mr. Hayden's "pep" talks . . . 
that sharpy ad-libbing we carried on . . . and the 
terifflc all-night stand at Mrs. Stimson's where 
we decided that in our treasury of memories "Best 
Foot Forward" would shine forever. 



filcuf JimsL 



Student QounciL 

OFFICERS 

President Edward Costello 

Vice-President John Monbouquette 

Recording Secretary Irene Perniola 

Corresponding Secretary Janet Blasenak 

Treasurer Marian Murphy 

Executive Board 
Bernard Sykes Jane Mahoney Joseph Uzdawinis 

Richard Sager Virginia Forrest John Coughlin 

Adviser 
Mrs. Riley 

In the belief that activity is the key to the meaning of life, the Student 
Council embarked this year upon its usual lively course with a crew of 
thirty. Mrs. Riley was again in charge. 

The early weeks of the fall were devoted to publishing football pro- 
grams from which both the Council and the Senior Class benefited financi- 
ally. These programs contained articles by the coaching staff, the principal, 
and the faculty manager. Pictures taken by Payton Williamson, and gossip 
columns containing the latest tid-bits enlivened the pages. All in all, it was 
a very successful venture. 

The annual football dance which was held in November was a well- 
attended and remunerative affair. Fifty dollars was donated to the A. A. 
from the profits. 

The Council made a ten-dollar contribution toward the Torch-light 
Parade and also supplied a float for this mammoth project. 

Several excellent assembly speakers were secured whose services were 
paid for from the Leighton Sumner Thompson Memorial Fund which was 
established last year by the Student Council. 

A subscription to the Junior Literary Guild was the gift of the Council 
to the school. This was intended as an opening wedge in the movement to 
re-establish our school library as a going concern. In this connection also, 
a book-plate was designed by one of the Council members, Jeannette 
Johnson, and one hundred engraved copies were presented to the school. 
Two books on parliamentary procedure were purchased and mimeographed 
copies of important rules in parliamentary procedure were made for the 
use of Council members. 

Early in December five representatives were sent to the semi-annual 
meeting of Eastern Massachusetts Student Councils. This meeting was held 
in Beverly and Ed Costello, Irene Perniola, Janet Blasenak, Troj Sykes, 
and Dick Sager attended with our adviser, Mrs. Riley. Our Mr. Sykes is the 
Vice-President of the Eastern Massachusetts Division. The representatives 
from Norwood High held the floor in the discussion groups which they 
attended and came back to the "Hill" serene in the knowledge that their 
own Council, in comparison with others, was a superior organization. 

Just prior to the Christmas vacation, our handsome and stalwart presi- 
dent and vice-president attended a grand two-day gathering of New England 
Student Councils from both public high schools and private schools which 
was held at St. Paul's in Concord, New Hampshire. If memorable for no 
other reason, this trip had a lasting effect upon the heart-interest of our 
President. The evidence as presented at the Senior Prom was entirely 
convincing, Ed. 

Due to the effort of the Council, the school took on an unusually festive 
appearance during the Christmas season. A Christmas tree adorned the 
main hall and another was placed in the lunchroom which was decorated 
with Christmas colors and posters from the art classes. Professor Dethier 




First row, left to right — Thornton; Nordblom, Johnson; Mahoney; Budahl; Sager; 

Costello, Pres.; Mrs. Riley, Adviser; Sykes; Perniola, Recording Sec; Blasenak, 

Corresponding Sec; Murphy, Treas.; Forrest; Coughlin; Uzdawinis; Flood. 
Second row — Frizzell; Thompson; Jamaison; Erickson; Healey; Legge; Monbouquette, 

Vice Pres.; Eysie; Campisano; Klinzman; Weisul; Lynch; Pierrepont; Nugent; 

Blanchot. 



and a wind group played Christmas carols in the lunchroom during the 
last two days at school. 

The compilation of a Norwood High School Manual was the next big 
project. The officers and executive board undertook this labor of love and 
the book is in the hands of the printer. It will be sold to the members of 
the school at a financial loss which will be made up by an appropriation 
from Council funds. 

A photo-enlarger was purchased which will be found helpful by future 
seniors in preparing yearbook material. 

An appropriation of $150 was made to cover the cost of a custom-made 
combination radio and phonograph with four loud-speaker attachments 
which will be presented the school upon its completion. 

The Council voted to pay $30 to the Senior Yearbook for a full page 
advertisement. 

On April eleventh the "Miss Norwood High Dance" will be held. 
Already there is much discussion as to who this lucky girl will be. 

The Council's Customary Contribution to the Culture of the Com- 
munity will be made on May second, when the entire first balcony at the 
Pops Concert in Symphony Hall will be occupied by Norwoodites. 

On May third, a large delegation will attend the meeting of Massa- 
chusetts Student Councils at Wellesley High School. Ed Costello and Ben 
Sykes will lead a discussion group on "The Active Student Council." 

If "activity leading to further activity" is called "growth," then the 
Council can well congratulate itself upon having increased its stature during 
the 1946-1947 school year. 




foaqtiwuL — Owl Sand, 



Disregarding weather and distance, the N. H. S. Band was present at 
every football game, backing our boys to the utmost and supplying the 
gay and vigorous airs which are so well attuned to the football season. 
They made a splendid appearance on both the home and "foreign" fields, 
decked out in their striking new uniforms. Strutting at the head of the line 
the very attractive and agile drum majorettes amazed and delighted the 
crowds with their acrobatic gyrations and the expert manipulation of their 
batons. Mr. Farnham, under whose direction the band has carried through 
with flying colors, may be duly proud of his fine group. 



dtoWibL. ofc QhwwL — Owl OhduiblhcL 



Under the able and expert direction of Professor Dethier, the Norwood 
High School Orchestra has, as always, succeeded in bringing the best in 
music to us. When the scattered strains issuing from 217 were brought to 
us in assembly in the form of delightful melody, we were able to appreciate 
the hard work and effort which went into each perfect rendition. We con- 
gratulate this group on being one of the best orchestras in the state and 
thank them for bringing many "hours of charm" to us. 





INTERMISSION TIME 




GRAND MARCH 




February 14, 1947 




TIME TO LEAVE 



(pjwwuwjajdsL 

Norwood High 





OUR OFFICERS 




ANOTHER VIEW 



RECEIVING LINE 




"ULmw 




J Jul Sabdtilsibu 



In presenting the Satellites of '47, the 
Senior Class once again was able to chalk up 
another huge success. The task of organizing 
and producing the super skit, which took the 
form of a radio revue, showing what goes on 
in a large broadcasting studio from morning 
until night, was a mammoth undertaking. 
We take great pride in the fact that our show 
was staged with a cast of well over a hun- 
dred — practically the entire Senior Class. 

We were often faced with what seemed 
insurmountable difficulties — the time was 
short, rehearsals conflicted, music was mys- 




afr 1%7 



teriously lost, no one arrived any place on 
time, and the temperaments of one hundred- 
odd people clashed. But we'll never forget 
the high-kicking, lusty singing boys' chorus, 
our many pretty girls, the antics in the com- 
edy numbers, our talented sopranos, the 
celestial beauty of the Ave Maria scene, the 
marvelous direction of our clever producer, 
Miss Byrne, who, with her usual unparalleled 
skill, molded an unwieldly and often unman- 
ageable group into finished professional per- 
formers. Also the timeless effort and energy 
of the many people concerned who heartily 
agree that "there's no business like show 
business." 




First row, left to right — Sideropoulus, Venterosa, Johnston, Eysie, Hillman, Macleod 

(Lt.) , Costello, Dwane, Flood, Curran. 
Second row — Cisternelli, Rudvilovitch, Coughlin, Davison, Wheeler, Mahoney, Nikituk, 

Costello (Capt.), Trusauskis, Stimson, Johnson, Latham, Forrest, Perniola (Lt.), 

Rabinovitz, Blasenak, Yelapi, Mattson. 
Third row — Camelio, DelSignore, Maroney, Sag-er, Sykes (Lt.), Hefferan, Lynch, Ceko- 

vich, Gay, McTernan, Riley, Budahl (Lt.), Campisano. 



JimiL Out 



When Mr. Hayden became principal, the job of managing the traffic 
squad fell into the hands of Mr. O'Donnell, our new Dean of Boys. At the 
beginning of the year our behavior was like that of all new squads. How- 
ever, after Mr. O'Donnell became accustomed to the traditions of Norwood 
High we were made to realize that the traffic squad was more than merely 
a means of leaving class minutes early and getting back minutes late. 
Many responsibilities were mixed with pleasures; gradually we were 
molded into an efficient body and in spite of the difficulties which the 
sophomores and juniors presented to us we grudgingly admit that we've 
done a magnificent job. 



Spoon. Qlub 



The Class of 1947 has many reasons for being proud of itself, as it 
has a great many "firsts" to its credit. Among these "firsts" are the 
"Torchlight Parade" and Sports Banquets. This year we have another 
first, "The Spoon Club." 

This club was founded on September 18, 1946, with prospects of a good 
year ahead. The club has done many things to rate praise and merit from 
all. One accomplishment was the March of Dimes collection which netted 
the staggering sum of $126.50. This amount has never before been equalled 
in this school. 

Another achievement for the "Spoon Club" was winning first prize for 
the best float in the mammoth Torchlight Parade which took place on the 
night before the Thanksgiving Day Football Game with Dedham. The 
"Spoon Club" also participated in the Senior Satellites which was the best 
show in years. The "Spoon Club" act was a great addition to the show. 

At the present time the organization is very exclusive and limited to 
those who are members of Miss Elliot's fifth period Problems of Democracy 
class. The industrious officers of this booming organization are: 

President Sylvester "Mac" McNeil 

Vice-President Joseph "Joe" Wall 

Secretary Rena "Dolly" Venterosa 

Treasurer Paul "Skippy" Gay 

Lawyer Joseph "Joe" Grasso 

Editor-in-Chief John "Moose" Sullivan 

We hope that the Spoon Club will long be remembered by those who 
come after us. Long live the Spoon Club! ! ! 

S. M. 

" H I Mm i 




Left to right, front row — Tauber, Curran, Bowles, McNeil, Wall, Grasso, Galano. 

Second row — Mattson, Delsignore, Campisano, Camelio, Yelapi, Maroney, Pitzmorris, Gay, Connolly, 

Wall. 
Third row — Seastrand, Carchedi, Bilotta, Sullivan, Garland, Reynolds, Perkins, Carol Johnston, Boch, 

Eileen O'Sullivan, Charlotte Oak'es, Jane Nordblom, Mary Jane Hillman. 




Front row, left to right — Ready, Curran, Blais, Docar, Nikituk. 

Second row — Naughton, O'Donnell, Fleck, Miss Ryan, Walker, Sironka, Rabinovitz. 



^Ajocwjua, ^Civing. 



"How do you do?" 

"Welcome to our 'Gracious Living' page!" 

"Perhaps you are wondering just what the words 'Gracious Living' 
stand for? Well, if you will sit back and make yourselves comfortable we 
will try our best to give you a preview." 

The Gracious Living course is the most recent and timely offering of 
the Home Economics Department of Norwood High School and was organ- 
ized as a major elective for Senior Girls. The course was offered for the 
first time in September, 1946, so we feel honored and most fortunate in being 
the pioneer class in the development of the course and the first class to 
enjoy its privileges. We have worked together as one happy family, for 
the good of all. We are an informal group and have had much fun even as 
we worked hard. 

We started the year studying ourselves and those around us and have 
grown to know and understand ourselves and others as never before. We 
have been helped by understanding and sympathy to bring out our own 
personal good habits and characteristics and to conquer the less desirable 
ones. We have discussed the correct way of living, how to act in public and 
all phases of "Gracious Living" as applied to satisfying personal living and 
the conduct of a happy successful home. We have worked for the school, 
the hospital and our own class. There has always been something new to 
be done and we have learned much that will help us now and be useful 
to us in later life. 

"Gracious Living" has been one of the most exciting and interesting 
classes we could experience and there has been never a dull moment. We 
wish all future classes all the pleasure and help that we have had from this 
course in Norwood High School. 




INDERGRADS 



SofihomjoAJL TbJtadu 



In September we cautiously entered the front doors of Norwood Senior 
High and began our year on the wrong foot by trustingly inquiring of the 
Seniors the whereabouts of our homerooms. It seems that Seniors have a 
bad habit of forgetting where Sophomore classrooms are located, especially 
on the first day of school. 

Early in October we selected the following class officers: Alfred 
Butters, President; Charles Fisher, Vice-President; Betty Pierrepont, Sec- 
retary; Margie Williamson, Girls' Treasurer; Michael Cloherty, Boys' 
Treasurer; Arthur Gulla, Boys' A. A. Council Representative; and Ann 
Welch, Girls' A. A. Council Representative. 

Our first social affair in N. H. S. was the Sophomore Party. Everyone 
enjoyed himself immensely at "Club Forty-nine," and the tuneful renditions 
of popular songs by our be-whiskered singing waiters were duly appreciated. 

At the Torchlight Parade we showed our school spirit by appearing in 
large numbers with our artistically decorated float. What we lacked in 
musical ability we made up for, in strength and voice, as anyone who was 
present will readily testify. 

Now that we know our way about the school and have had time to 
examine it thoroughly, we are glad to say we like it. We like our principal, 
our teachers, and some of us even like our studies; and we hereby promise 
to work hardest to be one of the best classes that ever invaded Norwood 
High. 

D. W. 



Left to right — Gulla, A. A. Council; Welch, A. A. Council; Pierrepont, Secretary; 
Butters, President; Fisher, Vice-President; Williamson, Treasurer; Cloherty, 
Treasurer. 





Left to right — Chandler, Treasurer; Walsh, A. A. Council; McKeown, Secretary; Wood- 
worth, Treasurer; Uzdawinis, President; Donahue, Vice-President. 



£wuoA, fl&VJWVA. 



The Class of '48 trudged back to the School on the Hill that eventful 
September morn, not as mere Sophomores, but as that "in between" group 
given the questionable title, "Juniors." With evil smiles we proceeded to 
torture the new arrivals with slightly distorted stories of hardship and 
woe. Many's the unfortunate "Soph" that strolled casually into the boiler 
room which one of our well-meaning (?) Juniors had designated as the 
biology room. 

After properly initiating our fledgling "Sophs" into the rituals of 
Norwood High we settled down to work. Our first task was in choosing the 
crew to guide our "ship of state." The following capable group was elected: 
President, Joe Uzdawinis; Vice-President, Priscilla Donahue; Secretary, 
Janet McKeown; Treasurer, Nancy Chandler; Boys' A. A. Council Repre- 
sentative, William Walsh; Girls' A. A. Council Representative, Dotty Collins. 

The class was well represented in every field of endeavor the school 
offered, with the possible exception of that exclusive, industrious group, 
"The Spoon Club." As Juniors we outgrew our quietness of the previous 
year. We waded through legions of French verbs and Latin vocabularies, 
Geometric figures and Algebraic formulae, and periodic explosions in the 
chemistry lab which announced the debut of an inventive genius — whew! 

On January 24 we held our Junior Party which was a complete success 
with the "tops" in entertainment. The other great social event of our class 
was our Junior Promenade. With the support of all three classes, this was 
one of the outstanding social events of the school year. 

As our Junior days grow less numerous, we view with eager anticipa- 
tion that section in assembly which, as Seniors, we are destined to occupy. 

W. M. and W. G 




CJtaM, WUL 



J. RILEY and P. MacLEOD 



We, the graduating class of 1947 of the town of cognition, Norwood, and 
of the state of erudition, Massachusetts, do hereby on this ninth day of June 
in the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and forty-seven, emit our pero- 
ration in regard to our bequests. 

Supposedly, if not actually, possessing rationality and sobriety we do 
hereby repudiate all previous bestowals and concessions, and we make the 
following endowments. 

ARTICLE I. We leave our thanks to Mr. Hayden for the guidance he has 

given us in the development of our character as well as our intellect. 
ARTICLE II. To Jean Connolly we leave our thanks for all the out-of-the- 

room slips signed in times of stress. 
ARTICLE III. To the Janitors we leave a flock of pink-eyed gremlins and 

some aspirin to help repair the damage done by '47. 
ARTICLE IV. We leave Messrs. Scafati, Levanitis, and O'Donnell amid 

the sighs of the infatuated girls. 
ARTICLE V. To the library we leave a shelf of "Banned in Boston" books. 
To the Tiot Room we leave a ventilation system and some 



Jane Mahoney leaves her blushing complexion to Nancy 



ARTICLE VI. 

ashtrays. 
ARTICLE VII. 

Chandler. 
ARTICLE VIII. Steve Hefferan leaves his title of class flirt to Alphonse 

D'Amico. 
ARTICLE IX. Carol Johnston leaves her way with the boys to Eleanor 

Cisternelli. 
ARTICLE X. Joan Dwane and Skippy Gay leave carbon copies of their 

treasurers' reports so that the Junior and Sophomore treasurers won't 

wear themselves out with the bookkeeping. 
ARTICLE XL Richy Boch, Bob Rizzo, and Paul Cody leave their fond 

memories of Cody's car and tours of the countryside for adventure (?) 

to any enterprising Junior boys. 
ARTICLE XII. Rena Venterosa leaves her title of "swell sport" to 

"Chickie" Anderson. 
ARTICLE XIII. Dick Frates leaves his most prized possession, his water 

pistol, to the "Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Intellectuals." 
ARTICLE XIV. Mary Jane Hillman and Claire Welch leave their solo 

spots in the Voice Training Class to Joyce Condon and Thea Connolly. 
ARTICLE XV. Dick Budhal and Gerry Davis leave their unusual combin- 
ation of silent personalities and loud sweaters to Jack Coughlin. 



ARTICLE XVI. Marilyn Stimson leaves her "Merry" disposition to 

Marion Murphy. 
ARTICLE XVII. Ernie Wohler leaves his versatility to Bill Bamber. 
ARTICLE XVIII. Bertha Trusauskis leaves her "Mademoiselle" look to 

Mary Thorton. 
ARTICLE XIX. Bill Jankowski leaves his wit and crew cut to "Scotty" 

Monteith. 
ARTICLE XX. Mac McNeil leaves his aptitude for perception of attrac- 
tive "furriners" to Paul Lund. 
ARTICLE XXI. "Bunny" Salloom's multitude of witty remarks and man- 
nerisms we leave to both the Juniors and the Sophomores. There's 
plenty to go around. 
ARTICLE XXII. The crooners, Bill Wragg and Ray Masce, leave their 

talents to the Metropolitan Opera Company. 
ARTICLE XXIII. Janet Blasenak and Jeanette Rabinovitz leave their title 
"Les Belles Jeunes Filles" to Priscilla Donahue and Janet McKeown. 
ARTICLE XXIV. Janice Wheeler leaves her effervescence to Patty 

Blanchot. 
ARTICLE XXV. Joe McNulty leaves his ability to attract attention by 

sight and sound to "Buddy" Gordon. 
ARTICLE XXVI. Patty Coughlin leaves her title of "first married" to 

Dotty Collins. 
ARTICLE XXVII. "Shotgun" Seastrand leaves his athletic ability to 

"Butch" Walsh. 
ARTICLE XXVIII. Jeanette Johnson regretfully leaves Kenny behind. 
ARTICLE XXIX. Paul Camelio leaves his cheerfulness and gaiety to 

Ronny Woodworth. This has been handed down since '44. 
ARTICLE XXX. "Peggy's Pets" leave their basketball laurels to '48's 

English IV-C. 
ARTICLE XXXI. "Natsa" Nikituk and Marilyn Docar leave their love 

of Roll-Land to Eileen Baldwin and Lois Staples. 
ARTICLE XXXII. John Sullivan leaves his nickname, "The Moose," to 

the Benson Wild Animal Farm. 
ARTICLE XXXIII. Margaret Flood leaves her witticisms to Joe Miller's 

Joke Book. 
ARTICLE XXXIV. Link Lynch leaves the weight he carries in the class to 

any capable Junior boy. 
ARTICLE XXXV. Irene Perniola leaves her administrative abilities to 

Patricia Lynch. 
ARTICLE XXXVI. Charlie McTernan leaves his mid-morning dashes to 

Jim Palmerini. 
ARTICLE XXXVII. Jane Bergman leaves her headaches to any girl who 

can afford aspirins. 
ARTICLE XXXVIII. Dick Hanley leaves his collection of books to be 

censored. 
ARTICLE XXXIX. Mary Boulis leaves her "Spring Fever" to Prudence 

Pelletier. 
ARTICLE XL. John Fitzmorris leaves his excuses to John Cuff. 
ARTICLE XLI. Pauline Mucciarone leaves her basketball ability to Edith 
Selima. 



ARTICLE XLII. "Cisty" Cisternelli and "Wacky" Lukawecki, "the South 

Norwood Twins," leave their mutual loyalty to "Gunny" Hamlin and 

Walter Glazier, "the Cork City Twins." 
ARTICLE XLIII. Regina Cormier leaves her snap and crackle to Mary 

Capuccino. 
ARTICLE XLIV. The vets leave their smoking privilege to the residents 

of Smoker's Bluff. 
ARTICLE XLV. Anna Santoro leaves her skates to anyone with a pair 

of crutches. They'll need them. 
ARTICLE XL VI. "Wild Willy" Walker leaves his savage instincts to 

"Handsome Hank" Trusevitch. 
ARTICLE XLVII. "Sabu" Connolly and Timmy Curran leave their finesse 

on and off skates to Jack Monbouqette and Arthur Vietze. 
ARTICLE XLVIII. Herby and Arthur Gearty leave their slogan, "Put 

your feet in Gearty's hands and limp forever after," to Tommy Dwane. 
ARTICLE XLIX. The Beauty Culture Class at Peabody leave Eddie 

Stacey to get in someone else's hair. 
ARTICLE L. George Boyden, George Assim, and Gene Palazzi leave their 

remoteness and profoundness to Robert Anderson. 
ARTICLE LI. Cliff Keeler and Richie Reynolds leave their stick-to-it- 

iveness to "Beetle" Learned. 
ARTICLE LII. "Chico" Rudvilovitch leaves his familiar cry, "Hexaaah," 

to Kenny Colby. 
ARTICLE LIII. Eddy Costello, our politician and orator, leaves with one 

final memorable oration. 
ARTICLE LIV. Troj Sykes leaves his unlimited talents to the male 

underclassmen — there's enough to go 'round. To the girls — a life-size 

statue, that they may continue worshipping at the shrine. 
ARTICLE LV. Dick Sager leaves his executive ability and infinite 

capacity for getting things done to Earle Legge. 
ARTICLE LVI. Regretfully the Senior Class at Peabody leave Miss 

Marcionette and the faculty. They also leave their thanks for the 

training they have received. 
ARTICLE LVII. The class of '47 leave their best wishes for a successful 

season to '48's football team and Margie Doucette's cheerleaders. 
ARTICLE LVIII. Ginny Forrest leaves the twinkle in her eyes to Jane 

Nugent. 
ARTICLE LVIX. Marion Curran leaves her title of class flirt to Joan 

Bristol. 
ARTICLE LX. Tommy DelSignore and Sonny Mattson leave some bananas 

to Henry Karshis. 
ARTICLE LXI. Bob Garland leaves his autographed Red Ryder B-B gun 

to Clem Walker. 
ARTICLE LXII. Skippy Gay and Payton Williamson leave their ward- 
robes to "Cy" Erickson. 

Signed, sealed, published and declared in the presence of each other, 
we hereunto affix our signatures as witnesses to the WILL OF THE CLASS 
OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY-SEVEN. 

Witnesses: 

Patty MacLeod 
Jack Riley 




SPORTS 




F 


T 
B 
A 
L 
L 



Coaches Scafati, Levanitis, Sulli 

van. 
Co-Captains Seastrand and Matt 

son. 



This year at the High School a new athletic regime was instituted. Two 
very fine men were selected to coach our team — Head Coach Orlando 
Scafati and Assistant Coach Steven Levanitis. The "Big Year" in athletics 
was in its early stages. Practice began late in the summer and the boys, 
under the capable Captains Seastrand and Mattson, had three weeks of 
drilling in the new system before school began. They showed definite 
improvement as the year progressed. Operating from the "T" formation 
and the Notre Dame box, they got off on the right foot by edging Needham 
7-6. Unfortunately, bad breaks culminated in the Framingham 12-0 defeat 
of our team. We just missed tipping over Maiden Catholic by the close 
13-7 score, with Maiden scoring in the last minute when Norwood was 
leading 7-6. Perhaps the Blue and White played their best game with the 
Red Raiders of North Quincy. Campisano scored on the first play of the 
game, but Quincy matched this. McTernan scored for the locals, but again 
it was tied 14-14 at half time. Then the Raiders surged to another TD, which 
was not matched. We hit the winning road again with a 20-0 victory over 
a celebrated Marlboro eleven and then came the climax! Norwood ran 
roughshod over Natick in the highest scoring game seen on the local field 
in many a year. The game (45-7) featured TD scoring by seven different 
men with the record, run on the Norwood field by Ben Sykes — 104 yards. 
Another win was chalked up over a powerful Cambridge Latin team with 
the score 13-0. Fine team play made the win column five and the lose 
column four when Punchard from Andover bowed 20-0 in a hard fought 
contest. Then came the game of games ! Dedham was given a slightly better 
6-3 edge, as against Norwood's 5-4, but it was to be decided by the breaks, 
unfortunately. A crowd of 10,000 saw Dedham score in the second quarter, 
but the Blue and White put on a sustained drive and scored on a pass to 
Maroney. This was called back because of offensive interference, but the 
spectators who were there didn't think so. They surged onto the field, and 
the biggest riot ever seen among Norwood, Dedham, and the officials 
started. Finally after pleading by the police, the coaches, the cheerleaders, 
the players, and the band members, the game was continued. Time and 
time again the locals knocked at the Dedham goal doors, but through some 
penalty or other they were denied the equalizer. This is a game that will 
live forever in the hearts of many a Norwood fan and player. A fine 
Norwood team, showing spunk and guts all the way, played terrific ball 
throughout the year and the school and the townspeople are proud of them. 





. 1 



Jk 



^ x U 



%*■ ¥ 





Left to right — Mrs. Riley (Adviser) , Perniola, Dwane, Latham, Curran, Egge, Blasenak, 
Rabinovitz, Costello, Sager, Sykes. 



(pJwq/uwL 7Hjob 



This year the publishing of the football programs was a co-operative 
affair with the Student Council and the Senior Class dividing the spoils. 
Because of the added interest in the football team and the consequent 
increased attendance at the games, this proved a very profitable financial 
venture. However, to the Mob, as Monsieur Sager so aptly described them, 
the pecuniary rewards were purely incidental. The hilarious hours spent 
in collecting (and inventing) items for the gossip column, the last-minute 
stapling of the sheets, and the fun and frolic that ensued in the wee small 
hours more than repaid them for their hours of labor. 

To the coaching staff, the principal, and the faculty manager for the 
articles they contributed, go the sincere thanks of the Mobsters; to the 
student body and the general public, a bow and a curtsy for the shekels 
they produced; to the members of the Mob in the picture above and to 
Payton Williamson and Jack Garner (whose smiling countenances should 
have appeared therein) , the memory of many hectic but happy hours spent 
in delight in their own humor and the unprecedented opportunity for 
foisting it upon an unsuspecting public. 

"Laughter is our object: 'tis a property 
In man, essential to his reason." 




-. 



Left to right — Hillman, Forrest, Doucette, Nikituk (Capt.), Mahoney, Eysie, Johnston. 



QhsuihkadsihA. 



Combining pep, ginger, personality, and spirit, our seven smooth 
cheerleaders were well-qualified to lead an enthusiastic cheering section 
throughout a successful football season. Headed by their "sharpy" captain, 
"Natsa" Nikituk, the gals, Jane Mahoney, Carol Johnston, Virginia Forrest, 
Sylvia Eysie, Mary Jane Hillman, and Margaret Doucette, worked long and 
hard to achieve the perfection and grace with which they performed. They 
were a genuine inspiration to the team, spurring them on to victory and 
inspiring the crowd of ardent football fans to give with the cheers that 
showed the boys on the field that "the school that backs them up" was with 
them heart and soul. 




Locals Slam Needham In Hoop Upene 

Scafatimen In Auspicious 
40 To 17 Court Debut Her 



-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, Jan. 3— Showing a w«a* 
■od material, tfn< Sorwnod High Wasters made an hit) 
c -.tart as tbey dfowaed Needham, 48 to 17, here this «ft 



ossy Milton 







i^lOOL. Jan.- 21 — l» apnc ' 

d High' cftpc^ rocked up: 

iploj; Walpnt 



If? Tight League Contes 

%, ^ 0< ; ^econds Oust Hosts 
^V^*x>5''^ ;,fl t Unbeaten Class 



Jjtl 6 % 




rwood And Framinghd 
"ash Af Boston Garden 

The Xomornl llijh.lioop (mm Will pllv their ( 
c at the R.slon Garden uhtn tliev tlasll ivtllr I 
« Bav Suite Itiicur tia, at J 





Left to right — Rudvilovitch, Campisano, Maroney, Sykes (Capt.), Bowles, Yelapi, 
Mattson (Capt.). 



B 
A 
S 
K 
E 
T 
B 
A 
L 
L 



Norwood High School's basketball team left nothing to be desired in 
the line of thrills, chills, and spills this year. The Blue and White hoopmen, 
under Captains Mattson and Sykes, ended the season with a record of seven 
wins and seven losses. 

With a few breaks here and there the team well might have been ; 
tourney-bound on March 7. After making a very auspicious debut under 
Coach Scafati by trouncing Needham 40-17 the locals bowed to classy 
Milton, 55-45. However, they bounced back by whaling Natick 58-27 at the 
Junior High. Then the first heartbreak of the season came . . . the 38-37 
defeat in overtime handed to Norwood by Framingham at the Garden. 
Later in the season the Scafatimen evened things up by a 44-38 win over 
the same group. The Wellesley game gave many of us a scare with all that 
blood on the floor but again we emerged from the fray, victorious. After 
taking a beating by Walpole on the ice the hoopmen took revenge by 
beating that club on its home court 44-36 and in doing so gave Walpole its 
first loss on that court in three years. Then that game at Milton where the 
Norwoodites played one of their best games . . . only to fall 43-40 in overtime. 
This was the second overtime game that our boys lost and both of them 
were terrific. Dedham, the arch rival, and Needham turned us back in 
quick succession but we ran over Walpole again. When we met Northbridge 
at the Junior High not many fans gave us a chance, but in the most thrilling 
overtime game of the year we downed them for a major upset, 33-31. Two 
quick defeats were suffered at the hands of Wellesley and Dedham to 
conclude the season. 

Co-Captains Bob Mattson and Ben Sykes, who combined with Jack 
Bowles, provided the Norwood forward wall with Chico Rudvilovitch, 
Butch Walsh, Bill Bamber, Teddy Campisano, Jack Maroney and Andy 
Yelapi acting as guards. Amos Dixon, Bob Young and Pete Lasinskas also 
saw much action. The second team, "lovingly" known as the Sophomore 
Sprouts, enjoyed an even more successful season than the varsity, which 
is good news to Coach Scafati. They finished the season with twelve wins 
and two losses. Jimmy Michienzi and Arthur Gulla paced this group whose 
other members were George Eysie, Arthur Turner, and Pete Lasinskas. 
The remaining members of the squad include John Poce, Cy Erickson, 
Richy Tamulonis, Jim Singleton, Anthony Gulla, Ed Kwiatkowski, Pete 
Kulbok, and Scotty Monteith. Let's not forget the managers, George Assim, 
Tom Golden, and Bob Haddad. 




Kneeling — Cekovich, Anderson, Mgrs.; Curran; Hamlin. 

First row — Wall, Connolly, Trusevitch, Seastrand CCapt.), Wall. 

Second row — Palmerini, Gearty, Monbouquette, McTernan, McDonough, Ivatts. 

Third row — Learnard, Vietze, Fisher. 



JLoduu^ 



For six years, organized hockey has nourished here at Norwood High. 
Our success in winning games has been limited, but we have succeeded in 
attaining to no limited degree, the fundamental purpose of sports in general. 
The response of boys to the call for hockey has always been admirable and, 
although competition with basketball hampers hockey, a club of average 
strength is always promising. This great national sport of our northern 
neighbor has a twofold purpose: First it is a wholesale sport ideal for 
promoting good health; secondly it requires clean sportsmanship and 
definite teamwork. 

Brother Ryan, of Montreal Catholic High, states, "A team's success is 
always dependent upon their teamwork, spirit, and coaching." 

Coach Learnard guided the squad this year and was assisted by Mr. 
Levanitis, our capable assistant coach. Shotgun Seastrand, captain, spark- 
plugged the team to three wins and seven losses. Deserving of mention are 
high scoring Tim Curran, who slapped in five goals; Charles McTernan 
with three goals; Mike Connolly, rugged defenseman; Joe Wall, his mate on 
defense; Boody Wall, our acrobatic goalie, and Henry Trusevitch, another 
wing. 

We beat Needham, Boston College High and Framingham, by 3-2, 3-2, 
4-3, respectively. Waltham, Walpole, Wellesley handed us defeats; and in 
the final play-offs, we were also beaten by the three clubs we had previously 
defeated, allowing them to smooth their record at our expense. 

All in all our hockey season was very exciting and provided many 
anxious moments. 

J. M. 



fliflsL J&OWL 




First row — Walker, Lynch, Jamaison, Dwane. Second row — Orleans, Crimmins. 



$ol£. JstawL 




Left to right — R. Haddad, Woodbury, Haddad, M. K. Learnard (Coach) , Gerner, Riley, 
Flaherty. 



J/uacL 




Left to right, front row — Coach Wheeler, Capt. Ma ttson, Uzdawinis, Monteith, Lawrence, Towne, Burke, 

Holman. 
Second row — Butters, Simoni, Corcoran, Butler, Allen, Praser, Roundy, Farren, Korslund, Barrett. 
Third row — Connolly, Flaherty, Heinz, Smith, Coughlin, Theall, Lynch, Tupper, Davis, McKenna, 

Learnard, Regan, O'Connor. 



J/zft/a/ fia&JudbalL 




Left to right, kneeling — Latham, Donovan (Capt.) , Wheeler. 

Standing — MacLeod (Timekeeper), Webster, Curran, Minkevitch, Conley, Dwane 
(Scorekeeper) . 






Upper Photo— Coach Andy Scafati, with the boys, in a pre-practice talk. 

Lower Photo— Co-Captains Jack Maroney and Ted Campisano with Coach Scafati. 




Veteran Lettermen, left to right — Don Meears, Butsh Walsh, Jack Bowles, Sails Wall, Ted Campisano, 
Mike Connolly, Jack Maroney. 



(BaMbalL 



From our perch high above the athletic field we can easily see Coach 
Andy Scafati putting his baseball squad through its paces these fine spring 
afternoons. Co-captains Campisano and Maroney make up one of the finest 
batteries in the state. With Jack Bowles, Pete Lasinskas, and Pete Klinzman 
as the other moundsmen we can see "Tournament" written over every 
pitch. A stellar infield is found in Seastrand, Poce, Wohler, and Meears, 
along with Gulla, Dixon, and Monbouquette. A fine outfield of Walsh, Wall, 
and Glaser will aid the cause. Also on the roster are Young, and Miksis, 
Vietze, Fisher. 

With the formation of the Bay State Baseball League will come truly 
great competition from the surrounding towns. But if the chatter and 
pepper which the boys show in practice continues and is any indication 
of the spirit of the group we certainly can count on winning more than 
"our share" of games. Coach Scafati has been blessed with some fine 
baseball material which he surely will mold into a smooth fielding unit. 

As we go to press news reaches us that Campisano shut out Framing- 
ham with two hits while he was striking out 15 batters. Norwood romped 
8-0. Bowles also pitched good ball in holding Needham to three runs, while 
Norwood scored four in the same time. We're on our way! ! ! 




FEATURES 




CIoa&u (p/uophexj^ 



J. RABINOVITZ and JANKOWSKI, Prophecy 

Time: 1967. 

Place: Space. 

Situation: Jeanette and I are traveling to the planet Palazater recently- 
discovered by the eminent astronomer Eugene Palazzi. As a sideline "Gene" 
is giving the thrilled inhabitants of the planet accordion lessons. It seems 
that the pilot of our space ship, John Fitzmorris, visited last night an extra- 
ordinary establishment known as "McTernan's Bessarabian Heaven." and 
now, dash it all — we are lost — somewhere between the Moon and Mars. In 
what seems to be our last moments, Jeanette and I are reminiscing. 

Jeanette: Well, Jan, here we are headed for our doom while old classmates 
of ours are back on Earth making history. 

Jan: Yep, why just last week I heard that Eddy Adamonis is now a big 
/wheel in the kiddy car industry, Joe Wall is head X-ray technician at a 
big hospital in Siberia and John Bowles has a wonderful job at the 
Opera House replacing light bulbs. 

Jeanette: Sure, and Vanita Egge has just won the academy award for her 
superb acting in the movie hit, "If the Little Moron Can Do It, So Can 
You," and Jeanette Blais has just invented the automatic lunch ticket 
seller which is used by Helen Balfour and Charlotte Oakes who are 
running that establishment where d'elite meet t'eat . . . the Norwood 
High Lunch Counter. 

Jan: Understand, now Jeanette, I'm not a gambling man, but the other 
day I was down at Joan Dwane's Caterpillar Race Track and I met Rena 
Venterosa who is now a Varga model. She told me that Marion Bartucca 
married a big iron and steel magnate. Instead of a wedding ring he 
gave her a 14,000-pound ingot to carry about her neck. 

Jeanette: Doctor Gloria Pearlman performed a very delicate operation on 
Regina Cormier recently. She sold the photographic rights to Life Mag- 
azine. Payton Williamson and his assistant, Florence Walker, were 
there to take the pictures. 

Jan: Skippy Gay and Joe Grasso are now big test pilots for the Luckawecki 
Sleeping Bag Company. Stan sent Joe and Skip on a dangerous mission 
last month. They were to test a new floating sleeping bag. When last 
sighted they were seen rounding Cape Horn still sleeping soundly. 
This may be due to the fact that they took one of Paul Galano's sleeping 
pills before they left. 

Jeanette: Betty Maguire is representing Massachusetts in the Miss America 
Contest and Kathryn Keady has just written a book entitled "Are the 
Living Gracious?" Mary Naughton and Dorothy O'Donnell have been 
the sources of her subject matter. It is rumored that she has made a 
quarter of a million on this one publication. 

Jan: Some of our classmates are big businessmen. Richy Boch owns a 
huge company which manufactures midget, high power water pistols 
for adventure-seeking high school pupils, and the millionaire business- 



man Dick Frates has Herb and Art Gearty working for him as book- 
keepers. Although their salary is only fifty dollars a week they own 
a thirty-room mansion. Dick Frates can't understand it but I can . . . 
They keep their books in Egyptian and the auditor doesn't understand 
Egyptian. Paul Cody runs a used car agency. He buys brand-new cars, 
breaks them down and resells them to high school students. 

Jeanette: Last week, when I was in New York I saw Sylvia Eysie who is 
the star vocalist with Ann Falconer's "Dreamy Time" Orchestra. Last 
engagement was at the "Hen House," one of the most fashionable 
night clubs in town. The genial manager, Paul Camellio, has made the 
place popular with his specialty — Chicken on the Hoof with Valentine 
Sauce. Also in New York, Marion Curran has just climbed the last 
rung in the ladder of her modeling career by wearing a cement bathing 
suit, designed by Jane Bergman, that stays on in hard or soft water. 
Her hair stylist is Eddy Stacey who perfected the "Never Limp Hair 
Laquer." 

Jan: I saw an advertisement in "Esquire" the other day. It said, "Now you 
can be as tall as she is . . . add as much as twelve feet to your height. 
Visit Ed Cisternelli's Elevated Shoe Company Today." On the next 
page there was another ad which said, "You need no longer be a 97- 
pound weakling . . . take our muscle-building course given by that 
mighty man of muscle and bulging biceps, Bob Mattson. Our course 
for women is directed by Jack Maroney. 

Jeanette: The last time I was in Norwood I visited Patty Hall. You remem- 
ber her name used to be Patty Coughlin. Also married is Betty Eklund. 
She married a big landowner in the West. The Government recently 
levied a huge tax on them and they threatened to secede from the Union. 

Jan: Jimmy Farren writes a comic strip for the Globe. He sure has created 
some screwy characters, but his latest one takes the cake ... he calls 
him "MacKenzie." I read in that paper that many of Jimmy's situations 
have to do with high school life. They say Mr. Hayden always reads 
Jimmy's strip first. Admiral Dick Budahl has set out with his entire 
fleet on a long cruise to Nantasket. 

Jeanette: Since Eileen O'Sullivan became Superintendent of Nurses at 
Norwood Hospital they have had to build a new wing due to the decided 
increase in male patients. Mary Santoro and Deidre Frost are head 
dietitians and former patients are clamoring further scrumptious 
recipes. 

Jan: John Sullivan is manufacturing table top covers. He specializes in a 
moss green variety commonly used for pool tables. 

Jeanette: Bertha Trusauskis has been chosen as the prettiest girl of the 
week by John Cook, and Peggy Stevens has just obtained a patent for 
her latest creation, the non-droop gym suit. 

Jan: I see that Steve Hefferan is a test driver for the Kallgrenmobile Auto 
Company owned by that man with a head on his shoulders, Sam 
Kallgren; and Shotgun Seastrand works on a turtle farm run by Chico 
Rudvilovitch. Shotgun is suing for turtle to turtle pay. 

Jeanette: Helen Fitzgerald is an airplane hostess for the trans-Atlantic 
Airlines. On her last flight she met Carol Johnston who is touring 
Europe. She is being pursued by a Prince, an Ambassador and a 
Maharajah but she prefers to spend her time reading "Of Mice and 
Men." 

Jan: We have several men of science from our class. Ernie Wohler is a big 
atomic scientist at M.I.T. He sued Bob Perkins last month . . . seems 
that Perkins manufactures neckties that are guaranteed not to stretch. 
Ernie got his tie caught in an atom smasher and it stretched. Another 
class brain, Professor George Boyden, is on the lists at the Bureau of 
Missing Persons. When last seen he was entering the library with a 
book of Logarithms under his arm. His whereabouts since then are 
unknown. 



Jeanette: We also have some journalists among our former classmates. 
Nancy Flower has just translated an old French manuscript. She is 
touring France as a delegate to the Society of French Linguists. Virginia 
Forrest and Mary Latham are collaborating on a book which should 
prove invaluable to High School Girls. Out of a wealth of experience 
gleaned from their own days in high school the girls are well qualified 
to dole out information and advice on "What Every High School Girl 
Should Know." Special attention should be directed to the chapter on 
"The Returning Veteran." Florence Chase has written a startling book 
entitled, "A View of Life fr.om Page 54 of the Encyclopedia Britannica." 
Bob Garland is writing for the sportsman's magazine, "Field and 
Stream." His latest article was, "How to Hunt Lions With a Sling Shot." 

Jan: I saw Vinny Bilotta the other day, all dressed up to resemble a million 
volt sign. It seems that that master electrician, Cliff Keeler, fixed 
Vinny's lights. When they went out again Vinny went downstairs in 
the dark and felt around in the fuse box. 

Jeanette: What did he feel? 

Jan: Nothing . . . for two weeks. 

Jeanette: Claire Welch and Mary Jane Hillman are co-starred in the new 
opera, "Two Sisters from Seville." They portray two lady barbers. 
Madeline Hyland has started an evening gym class for those who lack 
a sacroiliac. She has made the class well known throughout the state 
for her unparalleled instruction in Volley Ball. Jean Minkevitch is 
employed as a shopper for one of Boston's most exclusive stores. Her 
excellent taste is evidenced by her large clientele. 

Jan: A few weeks ago I dropped into a Beacon Street Apartment House and 
saw a door with a sliding panel. Out of curiosity I knocked, the panel 
opened, and a face I recognized as Dick Sager's appeared. He said, 
"Who sent you?" I said, "Chuck sent me." Then Dick opened the door 
and said, "O.K. Big Ben Sykes, the biggest politician this side of the 
Neponset River, will see you." Ben and Dick are really cleaning up 
in politics. Speaking of politics, last year I was in Washington to hear 
Senator Costello make a stirring speech in Congress. The crowd was 
tense as he rose, paused, and started in, "Helen, thy beauty is to me as 
. . . Nicean barks of yore." There was thunderous applause! 

Jeanette: Have you heard the new Margaret Flood comedy show? It's on 
every Tuesday night at nine. It features Link Lynch playing Boogie 
Woogie on his horn while Patty Costello giggles in accompaniment. 
Janice Wheeler is running a Reducing Salon. Her assistant, Marilyn 
Webster, devised a new system for reducing whereby the client lies 
down on the floor and is run over by a steam roller. 

Jan: I heard that Andy Yelapi is now guarding the door to see that Richard 
doesn't get out, and that Jack Riley is now head Turk in a Turkish bath. 

Jeanette: Some of the girls are in business, too. Anna Santoro has opened 
a roller skating rink and her incomparable manager is that beaming 
personality, Bunny Salloom. They certainly draw the crowds with their 
pretty little skating star, Marilyn Docar. Ethel Davison and Nancy 
Fleck have opened a drive-in lunch room on Willett Pond Avenue, the 
new super highway built by George Assim. 

Jan: Sonny Connolly is in Hollywood as Sabu's stand-in. Timmy Curran, 
the smiling Irishman, is a test pilot for the Rocket Fountain Pen 
Company. 

Jeanette: Ann Nikituk has signed a contract with M. G. M. Studios in 
Hollywood. She will be featured as a swimming and high-diving star 
in their new picture, "The Great Nymph." Her agent is the well-known 
Mickie Glynn. Patty Field can be seen in all the Shin-o Shampoo ads. 
Their slogan is, "You will dine-o and recline-o when you use Shine-o." 



Jan: Some of our old classmates went into the field of education. Dorothea 
Hawley has been named Dean of Radcliffe College. She certainly 
deserved the title after receiving the highest score in an intelligence 
and personality test. Her personal secretary is the competent Aldona 
Antonitis. 

Jeanette: Joe McNulty is the greatest bull fighter in Mexico. Billy Walker 
owns a soda water company. His greatest competitor was eliminated 
last week when it got wet in Canada. 

Jan: Last month I went into the Rizzo Ritz Night Club. Boy! Bob Rizzo sure 
can pick a chorus line. He has Jeanette Johnson, Pauline Mucciarone 
and Dorothy Earle up in front and Ray Masce is his crooning master 
of ceremonies. As I came out of Rizzo's I saw a book salesman slink 
out of a dark alley. On his suitcase was the slogan, "If it's banned in 
Boston, I got it." Who should it be but Dick Hanley. 

Jeanette: You've heard of the pens that are supposed to write in the 
stratosphere and under water, well Bill Wragg invented a wonderful 
pen that writes on the Moon. He sent Sails Wall up to test it three 
years ago. Sails was also commissioned by Vaughn Monroe to bring 
back some more Moon Maids. 

Jan: Johnny Kavall is head waiter on Duffy's Tavern and Tommy DelSig- 
nore is writing a comic strip called, "The Life and Loves of Lil' Jane." 

Jeanette: Helen Donovan has been awarded the tennis trophy for 1967. 
Her backhand is the most powerful since Alice Marble; and Teddy 
Campisano is star pitcher for the Red Sox. 

Jan: Richy Reynolds went west last year to fight the Indians. 

Jeanette: Helen and Sophie Baker are working for a large pastry concern, 
and Eleanor Concannon and Miriam Conley are working for the 
Boston Elevated Company testing third rails. They are getting a large 
charge out of the job. 

Jan: Stan Cobb now runs a big printing establishment. He's making plenty 
of money ... It seems strange but Stan uses a tremendous quantity of 
green ink. The FBI, now headed by Dominic Carchedi, is beginning to 
get suspicious, I'm afraid. 

Jeanette: Muriel Higgins and Robert Tauber are now happily married. 
The housing shortage is still so acute that they are living in a teepee 
on the Town Square. 

Jan: Gerry Davis owns a company which manufactures files. I understand 
that he does quite a business in the Alcatraz area. Also in business 
are Barb Hanscom and Audrey Nead. They are making big money 
selling ice boxes at the North Pole. 

Jeanette: Mary Boulis and Jacqueline Narducci are running a fashionable 
dress salon. Jane Nordblom is their chic little model, and speaking of 
modeling Joan Jasionis and Patty Lamb are modeling stockings for Art 
Craft Hosiery Company. Their pictures can be seen on billboards from 
coast to coast. 

Jan: General Walter Martowska is now in Slobbovia discussing the world 
situation and the high price of imported pickled pigs feet. Jane Mahoney 
is now a bigwig in the Grange . . . She is quite at home on the grange . . . 

Jeanette: Passing through a small midwestern town last year . . I noticed 
under a spreading chestnut tree ... a village smithy. It was none other 
than Mac MacNeil hammering away on a spoon. 

Jan: Catherine Carchedi has just created the latest thing in hair styles. 
Her "drippy curls" have won her nation-wide fame. Mary Meade's 
refreshing, relaxing facial massages have made her an indispensable 
member of Perc Westmore's makeup staff. Veronica Raymond and 
Teresa Mulkern run an exclusive beauty salon on Park Ave. Their 
specialty is wig marceling. 



Jan: Irene Perniola's executive ability has carried her far. Irene is now 
editor-in-chief of the National Police Gazette. 

Jeanette: Dorothy Hoyt is in Hollywood creating hair styles for the stars 
and Wilma Benjamin is her very efficient silent partner. And did you 
know that Eleanor Howe and Mary O'Connor, the kiddies' favorite 
librarians, hold a story hour on Saturday afternoons. Next Saturday 
they are going to tell the story of "The Big Wheel and How it Ran." 

Jan: Janet Blasenak may be frequently seen at Blue Hills Observatory. 
She has opened an art school there. 

Jeanette: Frank Cekovich is now the owner of "The Never-Good Grocery 
Stores." He has succeeded in putting the Ever-Good Chain out of 
business. 

Jan: Just last week as I drove through Islington I noticed that "Bud's 
Spa" is now "Ida's Inn" and the owner was none other than Ida Fietz. 
Muriel Rowen is her chief cook and bottle-washer. 

Jeanette: Theresa O'Toole has just established a Baby-sitter's Union. 
The organization is proving most successful due to Theresa's winning 
ways with babies, mothers, and sitters alike. Her personnel manager is 
Grace Puopolo whose interest in people well qualifies her for the job. 
Her private secretary is Betty Frizzell and Margaret O'Donnell is her 
publicity manager. 

Jan: The hours Elaine Lombardi spent waiting for the train back in '47 was 
time well spent, because she now tours the country singing with Millie 
Keizer's "Grand Ole Opery," and Dorothy Cody is now running the 
amateur shows at Guild Theater. Each show is opened with two vocal 
selections by Dotty. She draws a large crowd every night. 

Jeanette: Terry LaCasse is married and her children are just little Lambs, 
and I saw Lena and Lelia Marinelli last week with Peggy McGrath at 
Marie Mucciaroni's dress-making establishment, ordering a new cos- 
tume. They said that they were appearing on Broadway as the Three 
Musketeers in the new musicale of the same name written by Ogenia 
Kavolinas and Caryl Norton. 

Jan: Helen Curran is now the charming hostess at Lewis' Restaurant and 
Marie Golden and Joanne Sideropolous are the new owners of Garner's 
Drugstore. Last week they ran a one-cent sale on sundaes. Just think! 
Two for eighty-six cents. 

Jeanette: Helen Mills and Jane Milliken are running rival nursery schools. 
Last month Helen gave washing machines to the parents of the new 
pupils and Jane gave refrigerators. They are carrying on a real feud. 

Jan: Eleanor Weatherbee is celebrating the third anniversary of her truck- 
ing business. Boy, can she handle those "Mac" trucks. Her old class- 
mates, Christine Morgan and Barbara Wenzel are stockholders in the 
same firm. And I hear that Ann Smith is up in Canada. Did you know 
that she is the only girl ever to be accepted in the Northwest Mounted 
Police? 

Jeanette: Lorraine Stafford's Taxi Company is most popular with the high 
school group. She finds it a privilege to cater to such distinguished 
patrons. And did you know that Phyllis MacDonald has just bought 
out Ciro's. Jean Travers is her charming hostess. 

Jan: Christine Sironka and Patty MacLeod are nursing instructors at the 
Boston City Hospital, and did you know that Marilyn Stimson is the 
most charming ballet star since Madame Pavlova. She is starred in 
the Ballet Russe. 

Jeanette: Gosh, Jan, it looks like we'll never see any of those old class- 
mates again.. 

Jan: Yeah, it sure does, Jeanette. Goodbye, Jeanette! 

Jeanette: Goodbye, Jan! 




MONKEY ON 5TRIKE, 



I KEPT MY PROMISE, JANE. 



name: .cSam; c^ at\' 



PROGRf 



YEAR: 46-47 



NOftWOOD 



MONDAY 



TUESDAY 



A." 

4 - 






WEDNESDAY 



V 



& 






THURSDAY 




A* n 






VldwdL 





ADDRESS --TVWU, ^ 



W CARD 

«OPt HIGH PERIOD '. ivu*^ 





QlaAIiu SltftA. 



J. GRASSO and M. SALLOOM, Gifts 



Edward Adamonis a pen — now you won't have to borrow one 

Aldona Antonitis tooth paste — Phil (lips) 

George Assim a pretty girl — don't run, it's just a picture 

Helen Baker a can — add this to the "Kan Club" 

Sophie Baker a man — to make your outside library complete 

Helen Balfour a charger — to remind you of a certain TROJan 

Marion Bartucca a box of dates — to go on a rampage 

Wilma Benjamin a cartoon — "A Timid Soul" 

Jane Bergman a gold star — you're outstanding as a class worker 

Vincent Bilotta copy of song (Romance) — try it, won't you? 

Jeannette Blais a sweet pickle — need we say more? 

Janet Blasenak a melody — for a pretty girl 

Richard Boch a turban — for the sheik of Norwood High 

Mary Boulis a pillow — rest your weary head on this 

John Bowles a spoon — to go with your Bowl (es) 

George Boyden a bigger head — for all your brains 

Richard Budahl a tom-tom — to go with your war chant 

Paul Camelio a devil — you and he ought to get along well together 

Theodore Campisano an order — two straws and a Coke(ly) please 

Catherine Carchedi a season ticket to the Elks — we hope you enjoy it 

Domenic Carchedi friendship token — you're a swell guy 

Frank Cekovich a bag (of groceries) — to help you start your own business 

Florence Chase Ketch up — to help you catch up with the times 

Edward Cisternelli a key — we would like to lock you in our hearts 

Stanley Cobb a thumb — your old ons must be worn out 

Dorothy Cody a medal — for your singing ability 

Thomas Cody a new car — that last one was a beaut 

Eleanor Concannon a bell — but then, "Silence is one great 

art of conversation" 

Miriam Conley collar buttons — "In each cheek appeared a dimple" 

Michael Connolly a mask — throw it away and stop being a Lone Ranger 

Regina Cormier a comb — we hope you will use it 



5^ 



Patricia Costello a shoe horn — you fit into everything 

Edward Costello ... oil — to keep that smooth manner functioning properly 

Patricia Coughlin a marriage license — if eventually, why not now 

Helen Curran a potato — you're a hot "spud" 

Marion Curran dark glasses — "Through her expressive 

eyes her soul doth speak" 

Timothy Curran curlers — for those curly locks 

Gerald Davis sandpaper — may you forever be a smoothie 

Ethel Davison scissors — you cut a trim figure 

Thomas DelSignore a beautiful model — this will make 

your sketching more interesting 

Marilyn Docar a piece of coal (Whittemores) — not 

so much the coal as the name 

Helen Donovan baskets — the Seniors needed them this year 

Joan Dwane a treasurer's report — How does it feel 

getting one instead of giving one? 

Dorothy Earle high heels — these do something for you 

Vanita Egge a policy — to insure your talented piano fingers 

Elizabeth Eklund a pin— it's a Bobby pin 

Sylvia Eysie a piece of velvet — this reminds us of you on a dance floor 

Anne Falconer .... a copyright — you ought to patent your friendly attitude 

James Farren a pencil — keep 'em flying! 

Patricia Field a picture — you're as pretty as one 

Ida Fietz a diploma — that's all you wanted 

Helen Fitzgerald a map of Westwood — there may be some 

places you know that aren't on here 

John Fitzmorris a fig — or would you rather have a date? 

Nancy Fleck a pillow — you're a comfort to us 

Margaret Flood tall, dark and a pipe — will this do "Mame" 

Nancy Flower jack stones — we hear you like Jack 

Richard Frates Globe newspaper — Read G. Antheil's advice 

on how to act on your first date 

Virginia Forrest a mask — now cover up that innocent expression 

Betty Frizzell a cup — may it overflow with success 

Deidre Frost pie plate — we hear you're a good cook 

Paul Galano art gum — stick to it 

Robert Garland . a telephone — to help you get in touch 

with your classmates 

Paul Gay a scale — you have weight with women 

Arthur Gearty a penny — now tell us your thoughts 

Herbert Gearty a telephone number — will Norwood 1354-R do? 

John Glynn a governor — for your car 

Marie Golden honey — for your sweet personality 

Joseph Grasso a yo-yo — you have your ups and downs 

James Hanley a loaf of bread — your stay here has been one big loaf 



&/U. 



Barbara Hanscom a camera — you clicked with us 

Dorothea Hawley a toy — everyone should be frivolous occasionally 

Stephen Hefferan a candy cigarette — you won't have to 

sneak out for this one 

Muriel Higgins Bobby sox — forget the sox part 

Mary Jane Hillman a permit — to get (a) Shotgun 

Eleanor Howe a book — for good keeping 

Dorothy Hoyt a rooster — "he was like the cock who thought the 

sun had risen to hear him crow" 

Madeline Hyland a card — we hear you're one 

William Jankowski .... an oscar — for your performance in the Senior Play 

Joan Jasionis watering can — naming youth needs cooling down 

Jeannette Johnson . blinders — don't let them hide the twinkle in your eyes 

Carol Johnston a doll — you're as cute as one 

Samuel Kallgren . bowling pin — to remind you of your nights in the alleys 

John Kavall a South American costume — to go with your 

Rhumba figure and Spanish songs 

Ogenia Kavolinas a burlap bag — try to make something out of this 

Kathryn Keady . red paint — there'll be a hot time in the old town tonight 

Clifford Keeler nerve tonic — it doesn't pay to be bashful 

Mildred Keizer a car — let's make it a Kaiser 

Theresa Lacasse a carrot — not half as big as the one on your finger 

Patricia Lamb I don't know much about you, but keep this in the bag, 

someone told me you talked a lot so I'm giving you a gag 

Mary Latham a shopping basket — so you can bring home the bacon 

Elaine Lombardi atomizer — to preserve those sweet tones 

Stanley Lukawecki . handcuffs — may you and "Cistie" never be separated 

Lincoln Lynch a cape — to remind you of your interest there 

Phyllis MacDonald vitamin pill — maybe this will give you 

pep, vim, and vigor 

Patricia MacLeod sunflower — to go with your Sonny disposition 

Elizabeth Maguire .... Griffin polish — not so much the product as the name 

Jane Mahony a wine glass — with a toast to the best 

Lelia Marinelli one-way ticket to Hyde Park — why bother returning 

Lina Marinelli list of Senior boys— there ought to be one to suit you 

John Maroney a tumble(r) — give this to the girls 

Raymond Masce a contract with Kraft Music Hall — for your singing 

Robert Mattson a rose — -a friendship token for the girls you leave behind 

Margaret McGrath .... a photo album — to relieve the strain of your wallet 

Sylvester McNeil a soap box — with your gift of gab you could use it 

Joseph McNulty a hat — you wore your old one out talking through it 

Charles McTernan a book — Dickens' Christmas Carol 

Mary Meade a toy mouse — he is quiet, too 

Jane Milliken a box of powder — to hide your tell-tale blush 



3#k 



Helen Mills a padlock — may your life continue to be a mystery 

Jeanne Minkevitch a fashion book — you're always "tres" chic 

Christine Morgan a battery — to charge the hidden life out of you 

Marie Mucciarone a forget-me-not — who could forget such a swell kid 

Pauline Mucciarone a life preserver — now you won't drown 

in those waves 

Teresa Mulkern smelling salts — to keep up your spirits 

Jacqueline Narducci satin hangers — for your nice wardrobe 

Mary Naughton a slogan— there'll always be a Dedham 

Audrey Nead slide rule — for easier calculations 

Anastasia Nikituk bubble bath — to go with your sparkling personality 

Jane Nordblom •. ._. a brush — may your locks forever gleam 

Caryl Norton an elastic — you're good at stretching, see 

what you can do with this 

Charlotte Oakes a buckle — this is the nearest I could get to Buckley 

Mary O'Connor an angel— so you may ever be as virtuous as you are 

Dorothy O'Donnell a bomb — you're as active as one 

Margaret O'Donnell a spring — you're always wound up 

Eileen O'Sullivan a shamrock — to remind you of your nickname 

Theresa O'Toole a peach — that's you through and through 

Eugene Palazzi a note — for your musical ability 

Gloria Pearlman . a clue — will this reveal your hidden personality 

Robert Perkins a red shirt — now we'll know you're arouna 

Irene Perniola an emerald — you've been a jewel in our class 

Grace Puopolo a handkerchief — for your nose (y) trouble 

Jeanette Rabinovitz a magnet — it's like you — attractive 

Veronica Raymond . . hair pins — these come in handy for every hairdresser 

Richard Reynolds a pair of glasses — to see the fun that 

is going on all about you 

Jack Riley emery board — to sharpen your wit 

Robert Rizzo box of Educator crackers — you're quick with the "crax" 

Muriel Rowen a free ticket to Roll-Land — have one on us this time 

John Rudvilovitch a contract — stand in for "Chico" Marx 

Richard Sager a crown — for the "Prince of Knowledge" 

Marion Salloom a shaker — you're the salt in our class 

Francis Seastrstrand a coat hanger — for your manly shoulders 

Joanna Sideropoulos a loving cup — "We know not what to give 

you, thou art so dear" 

Christine Sironka thermometer — all nurses use them 

Ann Smith a noise maker — to let us know you're around 

Edward Stacey a wig — now you can practice at home 

Lorraine Stafford a rattle— to keep you humored 

Margaret Stevens a globe — to follow your sailor's travels 

Anna Santoro a machine gun— this describes your laugh 



5*ft& 



Mary Santoro a fickle eye — in case your old one gets tired 

Marilyn Stimson ballet slippers — to aid you in your life work 

John Sullivan a piece of felt — to repair the many pool tables 

you have worn out 

Bernard Sykes a piano — it's like you "upright" and "grand"— 

Robert Tauber a laurel — for your poetic ability 

Jean Travers a policy — to insure you against the next accident 

Bertha Trusauskis a copy of Mademoiselle — there may be some 

styles in here you haven't seen 

Rena Ventorosa a rose (in full bloom) — this reminds us of you 

Florence Walker a snapshot — to remind you of someone 

William Walker a balloon — now let off some of that hot air 

Francis Wall a bulb — to replace the burned-out red ones in the arena 

Joseph Wall out-of-room slip — a legal one for a change 

Eleanor Weatherbee a truck— a Mac truck 

Marilyn Webster a cup — for being such a swell sport 

Claire Welch a record — with a (Song-in) my heart 

Barbara Wenzel a peanut — this reminds us of you 

Janice Wheeler a prayer — God forbid that I should go to any 

heaven in which there are no horses 

Payton Williamson a camera — as an award — you're "Purdy" swell 

Ernest Wohler an accent — now you're a real Harvard man 

William Wragg a bottle of chloroform — for peace in your home room 

Andrew Yelapi a caterpillar — some change from a butterfly 




PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTIZERS 
In publishing a yearbook, the adver- 
tising plays a very important part. 
Actually, it would not be possible to 
accomplish such an undertaking with- 
out advertiser-yearbook co-operation. 
With this fact in mind it is the desire 
of the staff that you patronize the ad- 
vertisers listed in this book whenever 
it is possible to do so. They have 
helped us tremendously! 



7\DS 



Compliments of 

THE NORWOOD PRESS 

J. S. CUSHING CO. 

BERWICK & SMITH CO. 

C. B. FLEMING & CO.. INC. 



Dulkis Super Service 



PERRY J. GROUSE 

REAL ESTATE 



109 Pond St. WESTWOOD, MASS. 

Tel. Dedham 1008 - 2907 - 2247 - 0265 



The most efficient real estate service in Norfolk County 



Compliments of 



THE NORWOOD LAW SOCIETY 



Hon. Frank B. Coughlin 

Dennis P. O'Leary, Esq. 
Francis C. Foley. Esq. 
Paul A. Sykes, Esq. 
Benjamin G. Sykes, Esq. 
Joseph H. DeRoma, Esq. 
James J. Curran, Esq. 
Nathan D. White, Esq. 
Charles L. Donahue, Esq. 
Joseph E. Riley, Esq. 
Walter L. Gotovich, Esq. 
Richard I. Gottlieb, Esq. 
Joseph S. Crowley, Esq. 
Francis J. Squires, Esq. 
Charles E. Houghton, Esq. 



FOLLOW 

THE BLUE & WHITE 



Read the Norwood Messenger 
every day for latest news 
about Norwood High School 

— SPORTS — 

— STUDENT ACTIVITIES — 

— SOCIAL EVENTS — 



THE NORWOOD 
DAILY MESSENGER 

Available at all news dealers 
or by carrier delivery. 



NEPONSET VALLEY 



FARM 



L. C. FISHER 



NORWOOD 



MASS. 



Ambrose "Press 



PRINTERS FOR OVER FIFTY YEARS 



U^orwood - zJtiCassachusetts 



BOOKS • CATALOGUES • BROCHURES 

SCHOOL AND COLLEGE VIEW BOOKS AND YEAR BOOKS 

MEMORIAL AND PRIVATE EDITIONS 

FOUR COLOR REPRODUCTIONS 



Ti/cUtted . . * GIRL GRADUATES OF '47 




Tor pleasant work with 

friendly associates . . 

Before you make any decisions as to what you are 
going to do after graduation, why not investigate 
the job opportunities which the Telephone Com- 
pany offers you? 

Good pay is among the many advantages you gain 
by working for the Telephone Company. You earn 
while you learn; the pay for beginners is good and 
you can earn increases beginning in a few months. 

Then, too, you will be working at an interesting job 
with congenial people in pleasant surroundings. 
Your job can be the first step in a real career in 
public service. 



r. 



Your teacher or vocational adviser can tell you 
more about work in this interesting industry. 




NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH COMPANY _| 



KUGEL PHOTO SERVICE 

151 Walnut Ave. 

NORWOOD, MASS. 

Nor. 0078-M 



General and Candid 
PHOTOGRAPHY 



CHILDREN A SPECIALTY 



FOR HAPPY AND COMFORTABLE 
HOMES 

We Sell and Recommend 

'blue coaV 

New England Coke 
Timken Oil Heating 

Call 

John A. Whittemore's Sons 

Norwood 0764 

HAROLD L. ALDEN, President 



THE NORWOOD SPORT 
CENTER, INC. 

New England's Most Beautiful 
Bowling Auditorium 

Off the Town Square 
NORWOOD 

24 Modernistic Bowling Lanes 

Soda and Lunch Bar 
Table Tennis - Billiard Room 



Open Daily 11 a.m. 



Telephone Norwood 1283 



Compliments of 



The Modern Dairy 



350 Lenox St. 
NORWOOD 

Telephone Norwood 0084-W 



Quality and Service 
Traditional with 



L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY Attleb.ro, Mass 



Manufacturers of 

Fine Fraternity and 
Class Jewelry 



Representative: MR. GENE MANCHESTER 
Attleboro Office 



REGAN'S SHOE CORNER 




Sole Agent for 




RED CROSS 


Compliments of 


ENNA JETICK 

AIR TREDS 


NORWOOD AUTO CO. 


BOSTONIANS 




STRIDE RITES 




Compliments of 


ARTHUR J. FORREST 


BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF '47 


FORREST CONSTRUCTION CO. 



Best Wishes 
Class of 1947 

PEABODY 
CO-OPERATIVE ASSOCIATION 



Phone 2224 

PETER'S 
Wearing Apparel 

732 Washington Street 
NORWOOD, MASS. 


i 

DEAR FRIENDS: 

We want you to know the NORWOOD 
LAUNDRY CO., its values, its services and the 
people who run it. If you do we believe you 
will want to do business with us. The man- 
agement extends to you a personal invitation 
to visit our modern, sanitary plant and see us 
at work. If you have never visited a Modern 
Laundry, there are many pleasant surprises 
awaiting you. 

Norwood Laundry Co. 

884 Washington Street 

NORWOOD, MASS. 

Tel. 0999 


Compliments of 

GILRAPH MACHINE 
ENGINEERING CORP. 

506 Washington St. 
NORWOOD 


Phone 1666-W 

Norwood Men's Shop 


CLOTHING - FURNISHINGS 
HATS and ODD TROUSERS 


683 Washington Street 
NORWOOD, MASS. 


Compliments of 
C. I. DAVIS & SONS INC. 


Russell's Pharmacy 

125-127 Central Street 
NORWOOD, MASS. 

Reg. Ph. G. Skilled Pharmacist 



Compliments of 



BOCH SALES & SERVICE 



859 Providence Highway 



NORwood 1096 




Authorized Dealer 



NASH MOTORS 



JOHNSON OUTBOARD MOTORS 

Guaranteed Repair Service — All Makes of Cars 



BODY WORK 



WASHING 



LUBRICATION 



Official ALA Service 



HARRY J. KORSLUND 

ARCHITECT 

153 Nahatan St. 
NORWOOD 

DONAHUE'S 
AUTOMATIC HEATING CO. 

NORWOOD 0369 
JACK DONAHUE, Prop. 



Compliments of 



WAYNE L. LaFLAMBOY 



MARION'S CLEANSING SHOP 



Cleaning, Dyeing and Repairing 



Phone Nor. 1160 



842 Washington Street 



E. E. DROUIN 

The Store of Quick, Reliable Service on 

WATCH, CLOCK and JEWELRY REPAIRING 

of All Kinds 

STONE SETTING — ENGRAVING 

GOLD and SILVER PLATING 

SOCIETY BADGES and JEWELS TO ORDER 

BEADS RESTRUNG 



710 Washington St. 
Norwood 1303 



NORWOOD, MASS. 



ALBERT BONFATTI 

MASON and PLASTERING 
CONTRACTOR 

220 Neponset Street 
NORWOOD, MASS. 
Telephone Nor. 1832 



Compliments of 



F. W. WOOLWORTH CO. 



KESSLER'S SWEATER SHOP 

696 Washington St. 
NORWOOD, MASS. 

KESSLER'S for Smart Sportsmen 



Best Wishes 

Class of 1947 

from 
STUDENT COUNCIL 



Best Wishes to the 
Class of '47 

GREEN ACRES 



WELCH'S NEWSSTAND INC. 

633 Washington St. 

Tel. Nor. 0970 

Stationery, Cards, Office Supplies 



HOLMAN CATERING CO. 

E. F. HOLMAN 



POWDER PUFF 

842 Washington St. 
NORWOOD 



Compliments of 

NORWOOD COMMERCIAL 
LABORATORY 

EVELYN R. LANNIGAN 
Technician 



Congratulations to 
The Class of 1947 

from 
McLELLAN STORES 



Radios 



Bendix Refrigerators 



SAM'S AUTO AND 
APPLIANCE COMPANY 



645 Washington St. 



Nor. 1586 



BEST WISHES 



from 



JEN'S BEAUTY SHOPPE 



In the Long Run 



You and your friends will prize the portrait that 
looks like you — your truest self, free from stage 
effects and little conceits. 

It is in this "long run" photography that PURDY 
success has been won. 

Portraiture by the camera that one cannot laugh 
at or cry over in later years. 

For present pleasure and future pride protect your 
photographic self by having PURDY make the 
portraits. 



• PLEASING PORTRAITS 

• PROMPT SERVICE 

• RIGHT PRICES 

Means Satisfaction Guaranteed 



PURDY 



160 TREMONT STREET BOSTON 

Official Photographer Norwood High School 
Class of 1947 

Special Discount Rates to All Norwood High School Students 



FRANK A. MORRILL, Inc. 

CARROLL P. NEAD, President and Treasurer 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

Bigelow Block, 698 Washington Street NORWOOD, MASS. 

NORTH W ALP OLE GREENHOUSE 

Potted Plants and Flowers 

The Newest and Best in Corsage Creations 

FLOWERS TELEGRAPHED ANYWHERE 
Tel. Walpole 159 

C & W FOOD MARKET 

Heavy Western Steer Beef 
Fish -- Fruits -- Groceries -- Vegetables 

301 Nahatan Street 

Tel. Norwood 1620 - 1621 

FREE DELIVERY James Curran and James Wall 



Best of Luck to the 
Class of '47 



SANSONE MOTORS 
and 



SANSONE MOTOR TOURS 



Clothes that make the grade 

For a major course in smart clothes try Kennedy's 
famous Undergrad Shop ... the place where all up- 
ana-coming young men gather for the smartest 
clothes in the classroom or on the campus. You'll 
find jackets, slacks, topcoats, suits and furnishings 
with just the right amount of dash and color . . . style 
and wearability ... to rate a Grade A report in any 
school. 






KENNEDY'S UNDERGRAD SHOP 



Compliments of 


Compliments of 


DR. T. H. O'TOOLE 


THOMAS F. RILEY 
PLUMBER 


If the Government had it — 


Compliments of 


we have it. 


COUGHLIN & HALL 


MAL'S WAR SERVICE 


TRUCKING 




504 Washington St. NORWOOD, MASS. 




Nor. 2358 


Congratulations to the 
Graduating Class of 1947 


Compliments of 


from 


DR. KENNETH McELWEE, D.M.D. 


ALICE BAKER 


56 Walpole Street 




Tel. NOR. 0570 


Compliments of 




DREYFUS & WHITE 


GERTRUDE'S PASTRY SHOPPE 


Wholesale ~ Retail 
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 


Fancy Pastry Is Our Specialty 


620 Washington St. NORWOOD, MASS. 


641 Washington St. Norwood, Mass. 


Tel. Nor. 0592, 1526, 0482 





ELKS 

NORWOOD LODGE 1124 

Instituted June 23, 1908 




'The faults of our Brothers we write upon the sand, 
their virtues on the tablets of love and memory." 



PAUL A. SYKES, 

Exalted Ruler 

WILLIAM J. DALTON, 

Secretary 



HARVEY'S BARBER SHOP 

You grow um — 
We cut um. 



Acetylene and Electric 
Welding 



Silver Soldering 
Brazing 



EDWARDS WELDING WORKS 

990 Washington Street 
NORWOOD, MASS. 



EDWARD WISNIEWSKI 



Norwood 1417-M 



Compliments of 



ONYX BEAUTY SALON 



BRUCE'S ANIMAL HOSPITAL 
AND KENNELS 



Route 128 



DEDHAM 



REFRIGERATORS — Household and Commercial 
HOME AND FARM FREEZERS 

Complete with Service 

Washers and Landerall Automatic Washing Machines 

Maytag, Easy, Norge, Westinghouse Products 

Philco, G. E., Westinghouse, Crossley Radios 

Youngstown, Lyon Kitchens 

Hot Point Water Heaters Electric Ranges 

All Popular Makes 

Mangles — Ironrite, Simplex, and Others 



Gas Combination Ranges 



Gas Ranges 



Maytag Dutch Oven 



Appliance Sales and Service Co. 

1124 Washington Street 
SOUTH NORWOOD, MASS. 

Tel. Norwood 0639 



Compliments of 



Back Bay 
Electrotype & Engraving 



Company 



172 Columbus Ave. BOSTON, MASS. 

Han. 8790 



Compliments of 


Compliments of 


SEARS, ROEBUCK & CO. 


Norwood Machine Works 


607 Washington Street 


Inc. 


NORWOOD, MASS. 




J. H. PRATES, Manager 




Norfolk County Softball 




Ass'n— 1947 




President, JOHN HOWARD 

Secretary, GUY SILVI 


The Style Stars Are Out 


Treasurer, ERNEST OAKES 


Come — See 


BIRD & SON INC. 


BUICK FOR '47 


KENDALL CO. 


- 


FOXBORO CO. 




DE ROMA ELEC. CO. 


NORWOOD BUICK CO. 


WINSLOW BROS. & SMITH 
OLDE COLONIAL'S 


10 Cottage St. Tel. Nor. 0180 


WALPOLE SUNOCO'S 




BUTTERS TRUCKING 





THE HOLLISTON MILLS, Inc. 



WALPOLE ST. GARAGE 

Studebaker Sales and Service 

MOTOR CAR REPAIRS 
On All Makes 



24-Hour Wrecker Service AMOCO 

Nor. 1984 PRODUCTS 



THE HUT 



Sea Foods 
Sandwiches 



Chicken 

Ice Cream 



Cor. Rte. 1 and Highplain St. 
WALPOLE, MASS. 

J. A. GARLAND, Prop. 



Compliments of 



GEORGE R. ALLEN, M.D. 



Compliments of 

CARROLL H. WOODS 

INSURANCE AND 

REAL ESTATE AGENCY 

WARREN L. MILLIKEN 
NORWOOD, MASS. 



Compliments of 

NORWOOD 
MORRIS PLAN COMPANY 



Compliments of 



W. HUDSON SLEE 



Compliments of 
STEVENS' DELICATESSEN 

651 Washington Street 
NORWOOD, MASSACHUSETTS 

CHARLES M. STEVENS 



Compliments of 



NORWOOD MALT COMPANY 



GARNER'S PHARMACY 

Prescription Specialist 
KODAKS — CAMERA SUPPLIES 

693 Washington Street 
Telephone Nor. 0038 



NORWOOD 
PRINTING CO. 

FINE PRINTING 

100 Central Street 

NORWOOD, MASS. 

Telephone NORwood 1311 

UNION LABEL SHOP 



NORWOOD HARDWARE 



SUPPLY CO. 



BUSHWAY ICE CREAM 



<< 



Everybody Likes It 



>> 



J. HOWARD BUSHWAY 



BROWNE'S SPORT SHOP 

Quality Athletic Equipment 

BROCKTON, MASS. 
Telephone 1838-W 




JACK'S TAXI 
AND TRAVEL BUREAU 



Agency for Greyhound Busline 



On Emergency 12 midnight to 6 a.m. 
Call Nor. 0304 or 0085-W 



635 Washington St. 



Nor. 0022 



Compliments of 



RAIDERS VILLAGE INC. 



FOR FINE FOODS 



Fountain Service 



Sharon-Walpole Line Route No. 1 



HAMLIN'S 
SERVICE STATION 

Cor. Railroad Ave. and Washington St. 
NORWOOD 



MOBILOIL MOBILUBRICATION 

Tires and Accessories 

Norwood 0274 



BEST WISHES 

to the graduating class of 

1947 

from the class of 

1949 



Congratulations to 
the Graduating Class of 

1947 

from the Class of 

1948 



HOWARD'S APPLIANCE 

1163 Washington St. 
SOUTH NORWOOD, MASS. 



FURLONG'S 

Cloverleaf Candies 
and Ice Cream 



Norwood Theater Bids. 
NORWOOD, MASS. 



LEWIS' RESTAURANT 



Compliments of 



WILLIAM A. C. BRAUER 



Compliments of 



ERNIE GOTHAM 



KAREN'S BEAUTY SHOPPE 

All Types of Beauty Culture 

Specialising in Permanents 

For Appointments Call Nor. 0768-M 
485 Washington St. NORWOOD, MASS. 



ALDO D. PELLINI 

YOUR TAILOR and FURRIER 

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing, Dyeing 



487A Washington Street 
NORWOOD, MASS. 



1947 



EDWARD V. WARABOW 



Tel. Norwood 2225 Household 

Evenings Sharon 2198 Commercial 

Brown Refrigeration Sales and Service Co. 



All Types of 
Frigidaire 

Commerciol 
Equipment 




Authorized 

and 

Service 

Seles 



489 Washington Street, Norwood, Mass. 



High Quality — Fast Service — Low Prices 
Complete Family Cleansers 

Fur and Cloth Storage Polar Bear System 

SHIRTS LAUNDERED 

ROBINSON 

CLEANSERS — DYERS — LAUNDERERS 

532 Washington St. NORwood 1964 

CALL AND DELIVERY All Articles Covered by Insurance 



Compliments of 



TOWN SQUARE HARDWARE 
and SUPPLY CORP. 



599 Washington St. 



NORWOOD 






Compliments of 
JOHN E. CORBETT, D.M.D. 


Compliments of 

GEORGE A. SMALL 


RADIOS, REFRIGERATORS, WASHING MACHINES 
AND ALL OTHER ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

EARLE RADIO AND 
APPLIANCE CO. 

Radio Service Specialists 

Clarence N. Earle, Prop. 
516 Washington St. NORWOOD, MASS. 

Tel. Norwood 2444 


Compliments of 

CUMMINGS CO. 


Compliments oj 
GUILD VARIETY STORE 


T. FARIOLI 

GROCERIES 

68 Walnut Ave. 


Compliments of 

BERNEDDY'S 
MEAT MARKET. INC. 

654 Washington St. NORWOOD, MASS. 
Telephone Norwood 2334-M 


Compliments of 
NORWOOD FURNITURE CO. 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 



JOHNSON MOTOR SALES, Inc. 

354 Washington Street 

ISLINGTON - WESTWOOD. MASS. 

Dedham 1926 



OLDSMOBILE FRIGIDAIRE G.M.C. TRUCKS 



MAYTAG WASHERS 

ELECTRIC RANGES 

REFRIGERATORS 


MacDONALD'S 
Prospect Street Grocery Store 


ELECTRICAL REPAIRING 




GOVE ELECTRICAL CO. 


Complete Line of 
BIRDS EYE FOODS 


705 Washington St. NORWOOD, MASS. 




READ & WHITE 


Compliments oj 


GOWN SALON 


MARY'S VARIETY 




YOU ORDER — WE DELIVER 


111 Summer Street 
BOSTON, MASS. 


1358 Washington St. Nor. 2334-W 
Top of Morse Hill 


Compliments of 


Best of Luck to the 
Class of '47 


SHERWOOD'S SPECIALTY SHOP 


SIMONI'S FLOWERS 




NORWOOD 


Compliments of 


WEST ST. HANDY STORE 


CHARLEY MARATHAS 


FRESH MEATS AND VEGETABLES 


of the Cafe Venice 


and 


1086 Washington St. NORWOOD 


FROZEN FOODS 


Tel. 0742 


23 West St. 


The Original Home of Pizzas 


DANTE BALBONI, Prop. 



Congratulations from 



ORENT BROS., Inc. 




Business dreams 
come true 



A pleasant place to work . . . interesting, re- 
sponsible duties to perform ... a good salary 
from the very start, and steady advancement 
ahead, — all these are yours if you enter business 
through Katharine Gibbs secretarial training. 
Gibbs girls are sought for the most desirable 
openings, described in booklet "Gibbs Girls at 
Work." Write Enrollment Committee today for 
your free copy. 

KATHARINE GIBBS 

90 MARLBOROUGH STREET, BOSTON 14 
NEW YORK 17 CHICAGO II PROVIDENCE 6 

230 Park Avenue SI East Superior St. 155 Angell St. 



CLARK'S PHARMACY 
Conger Block NORWOOD 


Compliments of 


Headquarters for 
MOORE'S FINGERTIP PENS 


ALBERT P. NELSON 




REALTOR 

504 Washington St. Nor. 1320 


GUILD SQUARE PHARMACY 
Talbot Block NORWOOD 


NATIONAL JEWELERS 






THE 


692 Washington Street 


GUILD TAXI 


NORWOOD, MASSACHUSETTS 


Guild Square Norwood 2350 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


THE 


DE ROMA BROS. INC. 


ROSE ANN SHOP 


1033 Washington St. 


Compliments of , 


Compliments of 


HERBERT L. SINGLETON 


MOGAN'S SERVICE STATION 



ABDULLAH GENERAL STORE 



Best Wishes to the 
Class of '47 

from 

ROLL - LAND 



Compliments of 



LEWIS J. DANOVITCH. D.M.D. 



Compliments of 



KENNEDY'S CLOTHING SHOP 



BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF '47 



BIRD 

PRODUCTS 
55 




BIRD & SON, Inc. 

EAST WALPOLE, MASSACHUSETTS 
Established 1795 



NEW YORK 



SHREVEPORT, LA. 



CHICAGO 



TOWN SQ. FILLING STATION 

GORDON W. GIRLING, Prop. 

Broadway and Cottage Streets 

Phone 2221 NORWOOD, MASS. 


Best Wishes from 

BAKER'S JEWELRY 
652 Washington St. Nor. 1859 


Compliments of 

NESSON'S DEPARTMENT STORE 
726 Washington St. 


QUINLAN BROS. 

FRANCIS W. QUINLAN 


Compliments of 
DR. TIMOTHY J. CURTIN 


Best Wishes from 
JOHN'S FOOD EXCHANGE 


Best Wishes to the 
Class of '47 

BEREZIN'S CLEANING 
ESTABLISHMENT 


Compliments of 
THE SPOON CLUB 

"We will long remember our 
High School Days!" 



Compliments of 

BALBONI'S STORE 
856 Washington St. 


Compliments of 
SOUTHERN THEATRE 


GEARTY'S SHOES 

FOR THE FAMILY 

653 Washington St. NORWOOD 


Compliments of 
NORWOOD PHARMACY 

CHARLES C. LANGLOIS 


Compliments of 
NORWOOD DAIRY LUNCH 

WILLIAM J. POTHIER 


Compliments of 

NORWOOD AND GUILD 
THEATRES 


ALICE BEAUTY SHOP 

681 Washington Street 

NORWOOD, MASS. 

Norwood 0882-W 


Compliments of 
MORINI'S MARKET 



Best Wishes to the 
Class of '47 



Baker's Dress Goods Shop 



Compliments of 



The Print Shop 



Elm Street DUXBURY 



BASTIAN BROS. CO. 

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 



Designers and Producers of School Jewelry 

Commencement Announcements 
and Personal Cards 



MR. RICHARD C. SMITH 

Box 41 
LOWELL, MASS. 



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